CHATPRIVACYDONATELOGINREGISTER
DMT-Nexus
FAQWIKIHEALTH & SAFETYARTATTITUDEACTIVE TOPICS
MAJOR fungal infection... Options
 
GnosisOfAllogenes
#1 Posted : 7/22/2020 2:11:35 PM

DMT-Nexus member


Posts: 22
Joined: 14-Dec-2019
Last visit: 29-Jul-2020
Location: Somewhere in the Ozarks
Hello all.

I am posting in regards to my venerable San Pedros, who as some number of members may or may nor remember have survived multiple goat attacks, who have contracted some kind of horrific fungus. Pictures attached for examples of pathology. Here are my questions for cactus-cultivators: A) Do you happen to know what this fungal assailant is? It begins as a rust-colored patch of discoloration beneath the skin, then progresses to this white, scar-like material which then develops these tiny black spots over a period of time. Also B) from my research, the prognosis isn't really good. I think I need to cull the crop and start again from all the unaffected pups I have removed from the mother-cactus -- so my REAL question is this --- think if I made this mess into a standard tea that I'd be including nasty toxins from the fungus? Should I just attempt an extraction, as yielding semi-pure mescaline would remove some or lots (or all?) of any potential fungal toxins?


Here's the story:
I've had these growing since late 2010/early 2011, and have multiplied my cacti several times now as I always had a "thing" about harvesting with intent to eat my cultivated clones... I always felt like they were still too scrappy, they need to thicken up, they're too little, etc. I basically just didn't eat them, and living in a non-native climate where it gets to zero F/ -32 C many years in the winter I have to bring them in so they wont freeze. Well, then it got to the point that I was way cluttered up with cuttings on cuttings on cuttings (I still am, for the most part). Anyway, a temporary move to another city saw me transporting all of these cacti from the old spot to the new spot. I got all but the largest four specimens and left the four cacti in my dad's care.
Well, leaving it with my dad to care fore was just pure laziness on my part, and dang It appears I am paying for it now; he left them in a window just a bit too close to the woodstove... and there was some heat damage. By the time I found them, a few days of this cruel and inhumane punishment had already gone by.
I think it was these wounds that gave an opening to some opportunistic fungal attacker... because this horrible fungal scarring is occurring, well, all over. You all can see for yourselves, it's a horror show of bad Cactus-management skills.

edit - the examples attached here are all of the late stage of this thing. I've tried various fungicides, never was able to do anything more than slow its progress. However, with a solid feeding and anti fungal sprays new growth will outstrip the fungus, so I can salvage maybe the tips on a couple of these...
I'm worried about now introducing this pathogen into the clones that haven't been exposed yet.
GnosisOfAllogenes attached the following image(s):
Photo on 7-22-20 at 7.48 AM.jpg (228kb) downloaded 128 time(s).
Photo on 7-22-20 at 7.22 AM.jpg (136kb) downloaded 125 time(s).
Photo on 7-22-20 at 7.22 AM #2.jpg (162kb) downloaded 124 time(s).
 

STS is a community for people interested in growing, preserving and researching botanical species, particularly those with remarkable therapeutic and/or psychoactive properties.
 
downwardsfromzero
#2 Posted : 7/23/2020 2:07:49 PM

No way ticket

Chemical expertSenior Member

Posts: 4939
Joined: 30-Aug-2008
Last visit: 11-Aug-2020
Location: square root of minus one
How unfortunate!

FWIW, I recently stopped an outbreak of the dreaded "black spot rot" in a bridge-looking specimen by spraying with tincture of nutmeg (1:2 in 80% ABV ethanol). That's possibly a bacterial disease, though, rather than a fungal one - I'm not entirely sure.

Are those off-white areas in the bottom picture spore bearing surfaces? If so, it would be a good idea to keep the spores away from the rest of your specimens at all costs. I'd swab the spore-bearing surfaces very carefully with some isopropyl alcohol to kill off the spores without disturbing them too much..

If there aren't spores forming there, I'd be somewhat inclined to say the damage looks rather like sunburn. As well, some level of woody incrustation is normal for older specimens but, indeed, it running up the whole length of a specimen like that doesn't seem right.
Ora, lege, lege, lege, relege et labora

“There is a way of manipulating matter and energy so as to produce what modern scientists call 'a field of force'. The field acts on the observer and puts him in a privileged position vis-à-vis the universe. From this position he has access to the realities which are ordinarily hidden from us by time and space, matter and energy. This is what we call the Great Work."
― Jacques Bergier, quoting Fulcanelli
 
GnosisOfAllogenes
#3 Posted : 7/23/2020 7:37:39 PM

DMT-Nexus member


Posts: 22
Joined: 14-Dec-2019
Last visit: 29-Jul-2020
Location: Somewhere in the Ozarks
Hey, thanks for the reply.

Yeah, my pictures weren't really of good quality, so the detail was not really evident. The infection starts as a rust-colored discoloration, then progresses to the off-white scar tissue looking areas, which eventually begin to develop areas of dark black but tiny spots -- which I assume are the spore-bearing areas.

Any thoughts on health and safety concerns for consumption? I am definitely going to cull that big bridgesii specimen, who is by far the on that got it the most. Those four-sided pups which also got the disease were from that specimen too. :/
 
Grey Fox
#4 Posted : 7/23/2020 9:08:11 PM

DMT-Nexus member


Posts: 437
Joined: 14-Oct-2018
Last visit: 10-Aug-2020
Probably a good idea to remove those pups while they're still alive. Those white sections look too damaged to salvage.
IT WAS ALL A DREAM
 
downwardsfromzero
#5 Posted : 7/23/2020 9:54:37 PM

No way ticket

Chemical expertSenior Member

Posts: 4939
Joined: 30-Aug-2008
Last visit: 11-Aug-2020
Location: square root of minus one
Ah, the rust mould infection! That attacked some of my T. peruvianus specimens that had sustained damage after freezing. I was very lucky and, much to my surprise, 5 cuttings survived. I seem to recall storing them at a cool room temperature and low (~30%) RH for a couple of months. As well, I will have sprayed the cuttings with IPA before trimming off the rotten bits and then smudged them extensively with copal.

With short-spined peruvianus at least, if you can stop the fungus when there's still about 40% of green still on the surface I'd say the cuttings are in with a chance. Looks quite humid where you are though?
Ora, lege, lege, lege, relege et labora

“There is a way of manipulating matter and energy so as to produce what modern scientists call 'a field of force'. The field acts on the observer and puts him in a privileged position vis-à-vis the universe. From this position he has access to the realities which are ordinarily hidden from us by time and space, matter and energy. This is what we call the Great Work."
― Jacques Bergier, quoting Fulcanelli
 
GnosisOfAllogenes
#6 Posted : 7/29/2020 12:24:53 AM

DMT-Nexus member


Posts: 22
Joined: 14-Dec-2019
Last visit: 29-Jul-2020
Location: Somewhere in the Ozarks
Rust mold, ok, yeah that was what I was inclined to think as well. It is a real pain y'all -- if this stuff starts to get going on your cactus, don't be a slowpoke like me! Be proactive, save yourself some trouble, and cull any infected specimens. For sure.

It's been since, oh, say April that I first noticed it, and in that time it got that bad on those guys (who were the most-effected). There are a couple small ones that did have it so I'll need to get right on harvesting them.

I didn't take any photos of the harvest and prep for cooking, but underneath all of the scarring I was pleased to see that on the big bridgesii still had all of its dark green layer fully intact! However, the scars did make the process of skinning much, much more laborious than it otherwise would have been. Sooo flaky, causing the it to take at least twice as long.

edit: Oh, and as for location. . . let's just say USDA zone 6b
 
antichode
#7 Posted : 8/1/2020 9:05:46 PM

DMT-Nexus member


Posts: 469
Joined: 07-May-2009
Last visit: 11-Aug-2020
Ohhh man I get this with my bridgesii as well. Lost a few really nice to plants to it. I have many cacti however it only affects my bridgesii.

I’d love to have a fix for it. In my experience even if you get a new plant that shows no signs of it just being in the same area as an infected plant and your sure to cop some of it again.

The bridgesii that I have in the ground and with adequate sunlight and abundant nutrients are staving it off so plant health plays an important role. They are far more susceptible in pots compared to other cacti 🤷‍♂️
 
Budman
#8 Posted : 8/3/2020 2:34:23 AM

DMT-Nexus member


Posts: 11
Joined: 12-Feb-2012
Last visit: 10-Aug-2020
Location: Florida
Trichos, Bridgesii especially, are calcium hogs. I have a few different bridgesii clones that give me issues when the humidity/moisture is high, which is pretty much always where I live. Something like Copper fungicide is great to have on hand for this kind of thing. It will keep the fungal infection from spreading. Its never a bad idea to spray the surrounding plants as well, as a lot of these fungal pathogens can be transmitted through backsplash, or run-off.
 
 
Users browsing this forum
Guest

DMT-Nexus theme created by The Traveler
This page was generated in 0.022 seconds.