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Praxis.
#1 Posted : 2/3/2019 7:01:27 PM

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I've always loved music. As a kid I was the first to be picked up on the school-bus in the mornings and the last to be dropped off in the afternoons, and I can remember passing the time listening to music - completely immersing myself in "movies" or "montages" in my head (that, in hindsight, were very psychedelic in their presentation).

I had always assumed this was pretty normal and how most people experienced music, but by the time I got to college my roommates would jokingly poke fun at me for spending so much time just spacing out listening to music, not doing anything else. I loved watching movies and TV when I was young but by this point in my life I lost pretty much all interest in staring at screens. The scenes I'd play in my head, set to music of course, were far more interesting to me.

I'm realizing now that for me, listening to music is an immersive experience. It's hard for me to play music I like in the background while trying to have a conversation, because I actively listen to music in much the same way that people read a book or watch a movie. It seems to engage more of my senses than just hearing, if that makes sense. When I listen to music I haven't heard in a long time it's remarkable how it transports me back to that place in time - much in the same way that smell can trigger vivid memories and emotions.

I think psychedelics and cannabis use has definitely exacerbated this effect over the years, and its got me wondering how common this is for other people who take psychedelics. Anyone else out there enjoy "actively" listening to music without distractions? Is this actually way more common than I'm assuming in the general population, or is there something to back up the idea that certain individuals are more prone to musical sensitivity than others?
"Consciousness grows in spirals." --George L. Jackson

If you can just get your mind together, then come across to me. We'll hold hands and then we'll watch the sunrise from the bottom of the sea...
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Achilles
#2 Posted : 2/3/2019 7:19:31 PM

Fractals are eternally existing self reproducing chaos. Geometric figures, each which has the same statistical whole. Fractals recur at progressively smaller scales, and exist in constant states of chaotic anarchy.


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music and conciousnessi do... its completely normal to connect music to your concious state. lots of people believe psychedelics and vibrational frequencies go hand in hand like shamans and drums. most the time when i trip i listen to theta wave music or just music of my own choice and i can feel the energy from it (this feeling is comparable to walking into a room when two people are argueing and they stop, without them saying anything you can feel the tense negative energy)... music has energy that can make you feel happy, sad, powerful, etc... its most certainly a method for exploring conciousness and the research into vibrational frequencies effects on the brain prove that. so vibe away my friend... vibe awayThumbs up check out this link... it explains it scientifically Thumbs up Thumbs up Thumbs up
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TGO
#3 Posted : 2/3/2019 8:45:47 PM

Music is alive and in your soul. It can move you. It can carry you. It can make you cry! Make you laugh. Most importantly, it makes you feel! What is more important than that?

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Can definitely relate to this thread.

For me, active listening with minimal distractions is the way I prefer to listen to music. As someone who plays and writes music often, I am always analyzing, breaking down, and absorbing any and all music I hear. I like thinking about how the artist(s) made the sounds, what key/progressions/scales/time signature were used, what instrumentation, how it was arranged, and gear/equipment etc etc. I also consider the overall tone, message, quality, and presentation of the material. If anything (and according to others), I tend to way over-analyze whatever I am listening to. But I love every minute of it and enjoy it this way.

When I hear music, I instantly want to engage with it. I can sit around all day and listen to discographies of my favorite artists without growing bored. Throw in some good ganja or your favorite psychedelic and it becomes even more breathtaking. Music is most definitely an immersive experience that I attach all of my focus and energy to as often as I can.

In many ways, music is my best friend...we hang out a lot...Very happy As an introvert, communication doesn't come easily or naturally to me. But music allows me to express myself in other, creative ways. So it is also a place of refuge, a place of comfort. I immerse myself in it because I think that is what I'm supposed to do in life.

I'm actually in college right now. After two years of exploring and knocking out gen eds, I will hopefully be starting on my actual degree in Fall semester. This would be a Major in Audio Studies with a minor in music composition. I may be a little late to the college game (I'll be 28 soon), but being able to be involved with music as a profession one day is my ultimate dream.
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FranLover
#4 Posted : 2/3/2019 9:08:24 PM

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I played montages in my head as a kid too! Recently it has become synesthetic, Cymmatics (generally pink orange or blue) playing in the background of my mind. Waves dancing. They flow and its like I go with them, my spirit freeing itself. A little mary jane helps...not a lot, just a little toke to warm the love machine.
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And if there's a cloud above
If it should rain we'll let it
But for tonight, forget it!
Cause I'm in the mood for love
 
dragonrider
#5 Posted : 2/3/2019 9:08:47 PM

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Oh yes, definately.
But there are different ways to appreciate music, and some music can better be appreciated this way, and some other music can better be appreciated in another way.

For me personally, there are basically three different ways to appreciate music:

The most common and least valuable and immersive way, wich is as a background for all kind of activities like reading, eating, having a conversation, working, etc. Here music is realy not much more than a background, but it can help creating the right atmosphere for said activities.

Then, the second, more enjoyable and immersive way, wich is to dance.
There is music that, when i hear it, just makes me move automatically. With some music i simply cannot sit still when it's playing.

And the third, most enjoyable way, is to simply lie down, headphones on, and to let the music take you away. Not all music can do that for me, honestly. Classical music more than most popmusic, generally speaking. Especially the more romantic or expressionistic composers like debussy, strawinsky or prokoviev. But i often listen to moviescores too. I realy like most danny elfman scores. Some popmusic also has this "epic" quality to it, but it's harder to find. Listening to music this way can be realy like making a little journey.

So yeah, i definately recognize what you're saying.
 
0_o
#6 Posted : 2/4/2019 4:40:51 AM

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I have theories about music as a psychoactive we are evolutionarily conditioned to and culturally desensitized to.
Some forms of music seem to be extremely psychoactive, capable of actually causing hallucinations in otherwise sober people, however these are not types of music that play on the radio or even in most alternative subculture with few exceptions.
 
Psilosopher?
#7 Posted : 2/4/2019 7:27:00 AM

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I've always been an active listener to music. I think it's because of listening exclusively to metal since a young child. Metal is easily one of the most, if not the most technically challenging music to play. Only other music that comes close is classical music. Metal is really just classical music that is faster and with distortion. Both genres are "high information music". There are many metal songs that make my eyes roll back and i'm launched into auditory ecstasy. It's transcendent, and definitely psychoactive. Even more so when combining music and psychedelics.



As an angry teenager, i hated anything "electro". "Electro" to me was anything that used a computer instead of analog instruments. Techno, house, dubstep, rap, hip hop etc. I considered it all "electro". I saw it as boring and without talent. I have since expanded my musical tastes, and i have heard many amazingly musical songs that use only a computer. I remember watching Lil Wayne's guitar solo, and my teenage biases were reaffirmed. You don't need talent or musicianship to hook in people. All you need is something that catches the ear, regardless of how bad it actually is. Unfortunately, musical virtuosity doesn't equal popularity from the masses, or even appreciation. The masses tend to listen to music that is simple, repetitive, unoriginal and upbeat. The lyrical content is also depressingly bland and seem like they are written by a kindergarten kid.

As a result of many years of head banging, i'm extremely critical of other genres, as well as within metal (especially within metal). Every radio song is mind numbingly boring. I can hear the commercialism in the songs. It's not music that is meant to be listened to, it's music that is meant to be heard in the background. Same 4 chords, arranged differently, and you get 1000's of pop songs. When i'm at work, i always have one earphone in my ear, blasting music or podcasts. If i don't have my own music in my ear, and i hear a song on the radio that is painfully bad, i can't focus on anything except actively trying to block it out. I lock up, my eyes close, and i just focus on ignoring the terrible music.

"Better than a thousand hollow words, is one word that brings peace." - Buddha
 
Praxis.
#8 Posted : 2/4/2019 5:42:45 PM

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Wow, great responses everyone! Glad I'm not alone Big grin

TGO, I've recently developed an interest in music theory as well (or I should say, a desire to learn about it). I spend a lot of time trying to pick up on the more subtle parts of musical arrangements and wonder about the creative process that went into it, though I don't have the vocabulary or technical knowledge to really take anything substantial away besides my own speculation. I haven't attempted to actually create any kind of music in years, but one day I'd like to learn how to produce. I'd even be happy just learning how to mix, as I enjoy sharing music almost as much as I do listening to it.

I also used to listen to quite a lot of metal, Psilosopher. You're absolutely right that certain compositions can immediately put you into a headspace that feels psychoactive - I don't think it gets enough credit as a form of psychedelic music. I still appreciate metal although I tend to listen to a lot more ambient electronic, hip hop, and even oldies these days. In the case of hip-hop, there's a lot of garbage but I don't think anymore so than any other genre. I personally think it's one of the most raw and relatable forms of music there is. To take a piece of music you already relate to in some way (usually soul or RnB) and break it down to make a whole new piece of music, and then recite poetry over it is, in my opinion, the epitome of everything I think music should be. The culture of hip-hop is like a continuously evolving conversation about society, life, and coming of age. I think it's beautiful.

Of course the quality of a lot of music being pumped out nowadays is pretty depressing, but my personal opinion is that there's probably a lot more quality out there being produced than there is garbage. I think a lot of what's readily accessible to most people (ie, on the radio) has more to do with the influence of money in an industry driven by profit, moreso than a generational gap in talent. I can certainly appreciate music that's complex and difficult to perform, although I don't necessarily think that the value of music should be judged based on how difficult it is to execute. I think that if a song is able to make me feel a particular emotion I resonate with, the artist did a good job regardless of their technical ability. Maybe it's just me, but I think the idea that art is only valuable if it's hard to do is a relatively new fixation of Western culture. Art doesn't have to be an exhibition of skill (although it can be), but a medium for communicating the ineffable. But again, that's just me Smile
"Consciousness grows in spirals." --George L. Jackson

If you can just get your mind together, then come across to me. We'll hold hands and then we'll watch the sunrise from the bottom of the sea...
But first, are you experienced?
 
Tony6Strings
#9 Posted : 2/4/2019 5:47:54 PM

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When I was 19 years old I listened to a Jimi Hendrix hits cd called Experience Hendrix. Up until this point in my life I had been a punk rock enthusiast. Somebody gave me this cd, and I loved it. I ate an eighth of cubensis and listened again. I peaked to the song "Bold as Love." That did it for me, that was a life changing moment when I knew I wanted to play guitar. Not just to play around on one, but to study and learn and devote my life to the instrument. Shortly thereafter I discovered Grateful Dead which lead to more tripping and listening and inspiration. It's been a hell of a ride. The first time I smoalked dmt on my 29th birthday a few years ago, I put on Bold as Love right before I blasted off. That song will for always take me into the forever. Just ask the axis, he knows everything...
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Praxis.
#10 Posted : 2/4/2019 6:20:14 PM

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Tony6Strings wrote:
When I was 19 years old I listened to a Jimi Hendrix hits cd called Experience Hendrix. Up until this point in my life I had been a punk rock enthusiast. Somebody gave me this cd, and I loved it. I ate an eighth of cubensis and listened again. I peaked to the song "Bold as Love." That did it for me, that was a life changing moment when I knew I wanted to play guitar. Not just to play around on one, but to study and learn and devote my life to the instrument. Shortly thereafter I discovered Grateful Dead which lead to more tripping and listening and inspiration. It's been a hell of a ride. The first time I smoalked dmt on my 29th birthday a few years ago, I put on Bold as Love right before I blasted off. That song will for always take me into the forever. Just ask the axis, he knows everything...


That's awesome. I was introduced to Jimi by my father, his work was my first musical 'obsession' as a kid. The first time I heard his music on acid was a landmark moment in my life as well, and I finally felt like I understood his music in a way I absolutely never could before. Laughing
"Consciousness grows in spirals." --George L. Jackson

If you can just get your mind together, then come across to me. We'll hold hands and then we'll watch the sunrise from the bottom of the sea...
But first, are you experienced?
 
dragonrider
#11 Posted : 2/4/2019 6:26:11 PM

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Praxis. wrote:
Tony6Strings wrote:
When I was 19 years old I listened to a Jimi Hendrix hits cd called Experience Hendrix. Up until this point in my life I had been a punk rock enthusiast. Somebody gave me this cd, and I loved it. I ate an eighth of cubensis and listened again. I peaked to the song "Bold as Love." That did it for me, that was a life changing moment when I knew I wanted to play guitar. Not just to play around on one, but to study and learn and devote my life to the instrument. Shortly thereafter I discovered Grateful Dead which lead to more tripping and listening and inspiration. It's been a hell of a ride. The first time I smoalked dmt on my 29th birthday a few years ago, I put on Bold as Love right before I blasted off. That song will for always take me into the forever. Just ask the axis, he knows everything...


That's awesome. I was introduced to Jimi by my father, his work was my first musical 'obsession' as a kid. The first time I heard his music on acid was a landmark moment in my life as well, and I finally felt like I understood his music in a way I absolutely never could before. Laughing

Yeah, hendrix is great. He's been a real pioneer on the instrument. He should not have died that young.
 
dragonrider
#12 Posted : 2/4/2019 6:29:16 PM

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Btw, i do not agree that all populare music nowadays is bad. Just most of it. Every now and then, there's a song you hear everywhere, and liked by almost everyone, that's just a realy great song.
 
hug46
#13 Posted : 2/4/2019 8:44:20 PM

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Can't listen to music and read at the same time or any other task that requires a certain amount of concentration. Apart from driving. I like being self contained in a cocoon of sound with no other disturbances while traveling through the ever changing backdrop of the outside world. The navigation and operational skills needed for driving without having an accident seem to run effortlessly in the background. Unless i have someone sitting next to me that can't stop yammering.

Praxis. wrote:
It's hard for me to play music I like in the background while trying to have a conversation, because I actively listen to music in much the same way that people read a book or watch a movie.


I can't understand people when i say to someone "here listen to this music. Tell me what you think of it", and they start talking 30 seconds into the tune, and i go "Hey! You're not listening!" And they reply "yeah, yeah! Course i am!". My guess is that they start talking because they have already decided that it is not their cup of tea and that they cannot stomach any more without opening their mouth.

I think that there is a link between some people not liking a particular type of music and then deciding that it all sounds the same. They don't listen to it properly because their brain says "Ugh! I don't like disco*. I am going to partially disengage and concentrate more on a subject more to my liking". And therefore all of the little nuances in a piece of music that would be appreciated by a connoisseur of the genre are lost on the listener.

Yeah Jimi Hendrix! The first time i cam across his music was roundabout 14 years old. I was into heavy metal and punk rock. I thought that i was into some heavy stuff at the time, then i saw a clip of Hendrix doing wild thing at the Monterey festival. Bloody hell! It was the rawest thing that i had ever seen.
And i have forgotten a lot of things in my life but i can always remember where i was and who i was with when first hearing a pivotal piece of music in my life.


One of the beauties of music is that you are never wasting your time by listening to it.

*Disco was used as an example off the top of my head. I like disco. No members musical tastes have been harmed in the making of this analogy.
be safe

my music
 
TGO
#14 Posted : 2/4/2019 10:51:15 PM

Music is alive and in your soul. It can move you. It can carry you. It can make you cry! Make you laugh. Most importantly, it makes you feel! What is more important than that?

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Praxis. wrote:

TGO, I've recently developed an interest in music theory as well (or I should say, a desire to learn about it). I spend a lot of time trying to pick up on the more subtle parts of musical arrangements and wonder about the creative process that went into it, though I don't have the vocabulary or technical knowledge to really take anything substantial away besides my own speculation. I haven't attempted to actually create any kind of music in years, but one day I'd like to learn how to produce. I'd even be happy just learning how to mix, as I enjoy sharing music almost as much as I do listening to it.

...

I can certainly appreciate music that's complex and difficult to perform, although I don't necessarily think that the value of music should be judged based on how difficult it is to execute. I find that if a song is able to make me feel a particular emotion I resonate with, the artist did a good job regardless of their technical ability. Maybe it's just me, but I feel like the idea that art is only valuable if it's hard to do is a relatively new fixation of Western culture. Art doesn't have to be an exhibition of technical prowess


I definitely agree that music does not need to be difficult to perform in order to be considered good music. Most of the best songs ever written can be broken down into a simple melody line and the chords that change beneath it. The rest of the production, harmonization, etc is essentially flash and pizzazz unique to the artist who created it. Some artists really shine in this area and can take a simple progression that everyone has heard a million times and add a little clever twist here or surprise there and BAM, they've got themselves a killer tune.

I was just watching some old Neil Peart video on youtube and he was talking about the songwriting process for him and the rest of the band (specifically about the album Test For Echo). What stuck out to me is when he said something along the lines of how he carefully chooses simple little parts that fit. It doesn't have to be complex but it needs to make sense in the context of the rest of the song. I thought that was so obviously sensible, yet vitally important, especially considering that this is coming from one of the best drummers in the world who can play virtually anything.

One of my favorite songs to cover on guitar is Blackbird by The Beatles. It is a great example of a relatively simple song that is elegant, mesmerizing, and full of meaning. Nothing too flashy but it will make you think. The vast and seemingly endless ways to express ourselves musically never ceases to amaze me!
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Tony6Strings
#15 Posted : 2/5/2019 1:43:06 PM

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Here's a melodic improvisation I recorded about six years ago. I looped the chord changes with a Boss RC-2. I used a Stratocaster into a clean Fender amp.

https://m.soundcloud.com...ny6strings/spring-groove
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dragonrider
#16 Posted : 2/5/2019 3:28:20 PM

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[quote=Tony6Strings]Here's a melodic improvisation I recorded about six years ago. I looped the chord changes with a Boss RC-2. I used a Stratocaster into a clean Fender amp.

https://m.soundcloud.com...y6strings/spring-groove[/quote]
Nice.
 
Praxis.
#17 Posted : 2/5/2019 5:26:41 PM

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hug46 wrote:
I can't understand people when i say to someone "here listen to this music. Tell me what you think of it", and they start talking 30 seconds into the tune, and i go "Hey! You're not listening!" And they reply "yeah, yeah! Course i am!". My guess is that they start talking because they have already decided that it is not their cup of tea and that they cannot stomach any more without opening their mouth.

I think that there is a link between some people not liking a particular type of music and then deciding that it all sounds the same. They don't listen to it properly because their brain says "Ugh! I don't like disco*. I am going to partially disengage and concentrate more on a subject more to my liking". And therefore all of the little nuances in a piece of music that would be appreciated by a connoisseur of the genre are lost on the listener.

I've never understood that either! It's like talking through a good scene in a movie, drives me crazy lol. I think you may be onto something though, as people we tend to let our preconceived notions about things dictate our level of engagement with them. That seems to hold true for a lot things in our society, not just entertainment.

Also, most music is fairly repetitive in one way or another, like TGO is saying - so I think a lot of people may assume after they've heard the first verse and the chorus they've pretty much heard the whole song.


TGO wrote:
One of my favorite songs to cover on guitar is Blackbird by The Beatles. It is a great example of a relatively simple song that is elegant, mesmerizing, and full of meaning. Nothing too flashy but it will make you think. The vast and seemingly endless ways to express ourselves musically never ceases to amaze me!

Great example, I love that song. Back when my sister used to play guitar that was one she always practiced, hearing it always brings back memories of those days in my childhood.

I think what you're describing is part of what attracted me to blues music early on. At its core blues is made up of the same simple chord progressions, but there's something about how those notes are played that bores into your soul. And the variety of musicians, not to mention the evolution of entirely new genres, that grew out of blues is remarkable to think about when you consider how simple it really is at its core. I'd be interested to see if there's much research out there looking into why specific scales and harmonies seem to illicit universal emotions from people.


Tony6Strings wrote:
Here's a melodic improvisation I recorded about six years ago. I looped the chord changes with a Boss RC-2. I used a Stratocaster into a clean Fender amp.

https://m.soundcloud.com...ny6strings/spring-groove

That's really beautiful, and mesmerizing! The first half reminds me a bit of a bluesy version of Xavier Rudd. I'm glad you were inspired to pick up the guitar all those years ago, you've clearly got a talent Smile
"Consciousness grows in spirals." --George L. Jackson

If you can just get your mind together, then come across to me. We'll hold hands and then we'll watch the sunrise from the bottom of the sea...
But first, are you experienced?
 
dragonrider
#18 Posted : 2/5/2019 7:24:30 PM

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I think the reason why music can do that, is because music connects the higher and lower functions of the brain.

There are different ways of perceiving. There's something like noticing a smell. It's almost an automatic process. Maybe recognizing it requires a little more, but the gut reaction of either loathing it, or to like it, or even to get hungry...that's like pure instincts at work.
But then there's something like processing language or reading a map. There's no instinct involved in those processes. It's purely cognitive.

But listening to music is both. There's liking or not liking a sound, wich is an immediate, instinctive thing. And there's pattern recognition, wich is cognitive. And music is always a combination of those elements.

So it's like connecting our cognitive, thinking mind, to the roots of our emotions, the core of ourselves.

At least, that is what i think.
 
Tony6Strings
#19 Posted : 2/6/2019 7:01:29 PM

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Praxis. wrote:

That's really beautiful, and mesmerizing! The first half reminds me a bit of a bluesy version of Xavier Rudd. I'm glad you were inspired to pick up the guitar all those years ago, you've clearly got a talent Smile


Thank you very kindly for the compliment, and for giving it a listen. Smile
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You need to hit it with intention to get where you want to be!

Let it be known, there is a fountain that was not made by the hands of man.
 
 
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