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What should you do when you find an invasive species? Options
 
dragonrider
#1 Posted : 5/28/2018 11:49:13 AM

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What should you do, when you find a specimen of an invasive species (a plant or animal that isn't a native species and 'doesn't belong' in a certain environment) somewhere?

Especially with animals, my heart tells me not to pick it up or kill it. But i don't know if that's the best thing.
 

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Northerner
#2 Posted : 5/28/2018 12:15:14 PM

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Just kill it.

In a single act of brutality you will save a thousand lives.

Life is harsh. Humans are the problem for moving these things around. We can also be the solution.

Swift and painless.

I'm in Australia, I have seen the destruction naive and "humane" practices can wrought.
The nearest we ever come to knowing truth is when we are witness to paradox.
 
Mr&Mrs McShulfman
#3 Posted : 9/30/2018 2:24:03 PM

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An_Observer
#4 Posted : 9/30/2018 10:38:38 PM

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Kill it. Look at something like Kudzu. This is a very invasive species here in the states that from a single cutting, can take over and eventually kill an entire forest by covering the canopy to the point nothing else can get enough light to survive. And it spreads like crazy as long as it gets some water and light. And yet some people will intentionally seek this stuff to cover fences and such not caring just how much damage a single plant will eventually do.
 
Mr&Mrs McShulfman
#5 Posted : 10/1/2018 10:43:56 AM

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Look at something like human. This is a very invasive species that for a single feeling of mastering the rules of nature can take over and undoubtedly kill an entire forest by cutting the canopy and covering it with cement and metal to the point that nothing else can survive. And it spreads like crazy as long as it believes it can master the balance of nature with it's amazing capacities of comprehension.
Human is so intelligent ! It destroys the balance of nature by killing species and then gives advice declaring which species have to be killed to regulate the whole mess...

For sure westerners know exactly which culture has to disappear, which language must be eliminated, which belief is false and naïve.

When white men arrived in animists cultures, they saw them as naïve because they would not kill or exploit their environment.

If this is being advanced and educated then I'm retarded and savage. Kill to eat or kill to make profit or kill to regulate. I choose to eat and then being eaten.
 
third-eye-open
#6 Posted : 10/2/2018 4:26:51 AM

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I love this debate. Confucius says regulate, Doaist would spectate and contemplate. Every organism has the right to identify a threat and defend it's existence.
The laws of nature are governed by specific limitations that are constantly being over come by evolution. The boarders and territories we've conjured up are illusions. Adaptation is the name of the game and if an oganism is more efficient i.e. requiring less light, water or nutrients, then the more power to to it.
Invasive species? Sure. Immigrants migrate and "native", more like current communities feel pressure. Ultimately fortune favors the bold and survival of the most adaptable.
Kudzue, Ivey, Bamboo... be bamboo, strong yet flexible.
My policy is to irradiate as necessary not excessively.
Great topic
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Nydex
#7 Posted : 10/2/2018 11:18:28 AM

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Mr&Mrs McShulfman wrote:
If this is being advanced and educated then I'm retarded and savage. Kill to eat or kill to make profit or kill to regulate. I choose to eat and then being eaten.


Exactly, my friend. In our strife to be superior and go along the hasty development of technology we are slowly but surely returning to our savage roots and degrading ourselves.

On topic - allow me to cite Toby Hemenway's amazing book called "Gaia's Garden: A Guide to Home-scale Permaculture":
Toby Hemenway wrote:

Something was stealing the Bullock brothers’ food.

Joe, Douglas, and Sam Bullock had moved to Washington’s San Juan Islands in the early 1980s and set to work creating a food forest. They built up their property’s soil and planted fruit trees, nut trees, and hundreds of other species, all calculated to boost the biological diversity and lushness of this once-scrubby, blackberry-entangled parcel. A decade later, walnut trees and bamboo groves shaded the paths. Plums, peaches, cherries, and apples hung in thick festoons from spreading branches, and beneath them flowers, berries, edible greens, and soil-building plants sprawled over every inch of earth. The Bullocks had created a self-renewing ecosystem that fed their families and visitors, furnished nursery stock for their landscaping business, and sheltered local wildlife.

One edge of their property bordered a wetland reclaimed a few years before from abandoned farmland. At the marsh’s edge, cattails grew in thick stands. Young cattail shoots are a delicious wild food, and for several springs and summers the brothers had harvested the baby shoots, steamed or sautéed them, and added them to meals. But one year they couldn’t find any shoots, only tough mature cattail stalks. Their natural food source had dried up, and the brothers wanted to know why. A close look at the marsh revealed that some animal was gnawing the tender shoots off at the waterline. The thieves were thorough. Nothing remained for the Bullock brothers and their families.

The culprit was quickly spotted. “We’d noticed that as the bog matured and became more productive, the muskrat population was really taking off,” Douglas Bullock told me. The brothers had built garden beds that extended into the marsh, copying an idea from the ancient Aztecs. They had created peninsulas by piling straw and branches that reached out like fingers from the shoreline, covered them with rich bog muck, and planted these selfwatering garden beds, called chinampas, with food and wildlife plants. The local animals, already enjoying the new wetland, responded to the enhanced habitat of the chinampas with explosive breeding. Ducks, kingfishers, herons, and other water birds now abounded, and so did muskrats. “Suddenly the bog looked like a busy harbor, criss-crossed with muskrat wakes,” Douglas said. Whole flotillas of muskrats were tunneling into the rich soil along the marsh edge and nibbling down the cattail shoots. The less agile humans couldn’t compete with the industrious rodents.

The brothers lamented the loss of their wild food, yet refused to begin exterminating the culprits. “For one thing, we weren’t going to kill off the wildlife that we ourselves had attracted,” Douglas explained. “For another, we could have shot muskrats for weeks, and they’d just breed right back again. The habitat was too good.”

A cattail-less season or two went by. Then, suddenly the tasty shoots were back, and the once-busy “harbor” was more tranquil. The muskrat population had dwindled. What had happened?

“Otters moved in,” Douglas said. “The muskrats were a great new food source. We’d never seen otters here before. More than otters showed up, too. We got other predators: bald eagles, hawks, owls. They cleaned up.” Instead of futilely trying to trap the fast-breeding muskrats, the Bullocks sat back and let nature do the job. The brothers merely provided a rich, diverse habitat where a vigorous food web—one that included predators—could emerge and right imbalances, such as a horde of ravenous muskrats.


So that is my advice - lay back and let Nature do its work. She is way more powerful and effective than us. No 'invasive' species, as we like to call them, shows up out of nowhere. It is there because something provided the opportunity for that species to thrive.

Lay back, observe Nature, study the species in question and you will find what allows it to thrive - if it is something you do, adjust accordingly. If it is not something you do - let Nature take care of it. There's no point fighting it.

Be well. Love
“We are all wired into a survival trip now. No more of the speed that fueled that 60's. That was the fatal flaw in Tim Leary's trip. He crashed around America selling "consciousness expansion" without ever giving a thought to the grim meat-hook realities that were lying in wait for all the people who took him seriously...

All those pathetically eager acid freaks who thought they could buy Peace and Understanding for three bucks a hit. But their loss and failure is ours too. What Leary took down with him was the central illusion of a whole life-style that he helped create... a generation of permanent cripples, failed seekers, who never understood the essential old-mystic fallacy of the Acid Culture: the desperate assumption that somebody... or at least some force - is tending the light at the end of the tunnel.”
 
Mr&Mrs McShulfman
#8 Posted : 10/2/2018 11:42:40 AM

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There is a place and a time where everything has a role to play. The comedian acts and dances and ultimately he does not venerate the image of his own role, he finds his pleasure by playing with others.
Don't take your role too seriously or you will block the magic.
I'm OK with the bamboo stuff.
This song illustrate quite good the idea Big Bamboo
 
Mr&Mrs McShulfman
#9 Posted : 10/2/2018 12:04:52 PM

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Nydex wrote:

So that is my advice - lay back and let Nature do its work. She is way more powerful and effective than us. No 'invasive' species, as we like to call them, shows up out of nowhere. It is there because something provided the opportunity for that species to thrive.

Lay back, observe Nature, study the species in question and you will find what allows it to thrive - if it is something you do, adjust accordingly. If it is not something you do - let Nature take care of it. There's no point fighting it.

Be well. Love


And for those who are interested in the experience you will she how comfortable it is to trust and love the nature like your mother. Everyone has a role to play. If you are always shouting you won't listen the nature's call.
"Stop agitating yourself my son. I am your mother and I love you. You are innocent as all my children. Come back into my arms, cry as long as you want then you will feel good again, ready to go back and play with your brothers and sisters."
 
 
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