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Biosynthesis of DMT by yeast? Options
 
Wax
#1 Posted : 8/10/2013 5:24:04 AM

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Let me start off by saying, this is way above my level of comprehension of such topics, so I apologize for any ignorance I may be about to display. Embarrased

It is possible for yeast to create melatonin through fermentation if fed adequate amounts of tryptophan. Yeast can also produce many other substances through this process. So what if one was to feed a culture of Saccharomyces on say, typtamine?

I'm sure I am totally off point on this one but I would love to know why. Razz
'Little spider weaves a wispy web, stumblin' through the woods it catches to my head. She crawls behind my ear and whispers secrets. Dragonfly whiz by and sings now teach it.'
 

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arcologist
#2 Posted : 8/10/2013 7:15:54 AM

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I don't know the answer to your question, but I'll throw out another crazy idea that I think has been mentioned before: what if you could splice the genes for AADC and INMT expression into bacteria, then feed it tryptophan to produce DMT? Obviously probably hard to do without a genetics laboratory at your disposal.

My guess is that yeast might not possess the required enzymes (probably INMT) for biosynthesis of DMT, so no matter what the conditions, you won't be able to get it to produce any.
 
sabbathin
#3 Posted : 8/10/2013 8:00:54 AM

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So far i know there's neither of these genes in S. cerevisiae genome. So, even if you put everything you could in the medium S. cerevisiae won't produce DMT.

As for inserting those genes in any microorganism, I would rather go for electrocompetent E. coli. Nowadays, there are several commercial kits that allow you to do this kind of things, but they are very expensive. Also, you need some equipment, wich is even more expensive. Normally, if you do genetic-engineering is because there is a monetary background, or you have hell of money to spend it as you wish.
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Nathanial.Dread
#4 Posted : 8/10/2013 8:23:07 AM

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I don't know how different the biosynthesis of melatonin is from DMT, but it might work.

It also wouldn't surprise me to find out that there was already some kind of unicellular organism that produced DMT in at least a small amount. Mammals do it, plants do it, why can't microbes do it?

Honestly, if you got creative enough, I don't think there is ANY molecule that couldn't be synthesized organically by a correctly engeneered organism.

I have fantasized about modifying the ergot fungus or the Woodrose vine to produce LSD. Ergoline and LSA are both reasonably similar.

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endlessness
#5 Posted : 8/10/2013 12:04:23 PM

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Wax
#6 Posted : 8/10/2013 7:23:03 PM

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Thanks for that link Endlessness, I knew that it wouldn't be of any actual value considering the ease of extractions and apparently synthesis compared to the involvement of having to potentially do some genetic engineering on bacteria Very happy, I was just curious as to whether it would be theoretically possible.
'Little spider weaves a wispy web, stumblin' through the woods it catches to my head. She crawls behind my ear and whispers secrets. Dragonfly whiz by and sings now teach it.'
 
Nathanial.Dread
#7 Posted : 8/10/2013 7:38:00 PM

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People are doing it already.

The Nexus as a collective managed to tackle most of the problems with Phalaris extraction and solved them pretty effectively, as well as making bunches of new, improved, safer teks.

I see no reason (well, maybe one green reason) why we couldn't do this.

This article profiles a woman who is trying to alter a yoghurt bacteria to glow green the presence of a poison.
If she can do that, modifying yeast to produce DMT should be doable. Not easy certainly, but doable.

http://www.nbcnews.com/i...netic-engineering-home/

Quote:
The Apple computer was invented in a garage. Same with the Google search engine. Now, tinkerers are working at home with the basic building blocks of life itself.

Using homemade lab equipment and the wealth of scientific knowledge available online, these hobbyists are trying to create new life forms through genetic engineering — a field long dominated by Ph.D.s toiling in university and corporate laboratories.

In her San Francisco dining room lab, for example, 31-year-old computer programmer Meredith L. Patterson is trying to develop genetically altered yogurt bacteria that will glow green to signal the presence of melamine, the chemical that turned Chinese-made baby formula and pet food deadly.

"People can really work on projects for the good of humanity while learning about something they want to learn about in the process," she said.

So far, no major gene-splicing discoveries have come out anybody's kitchen or garage.

But critics of the movement worry that these amateurs could one day unleash an environmental or medical disaster. Defenders say the future Bill Gates of biotech could be developing a cure for cancer in the garage.

Many of these amateurs may have studied biology in college but have no advanced degrees and are not earning a living in the biotechnology field. Some proudly call themselves "biohackers" — innovators who push technological boundaries and put the spread of knowledge before profits.

In Cambridge, Mass., a group called DIYbio is setting up a community lab where the public could use chemicals and lab equipment, including a used freezer, scored for free off Craigslist, that drops to 80 degrees below zero, the temperature needed to keep many kinds of bacteria alive.

Co-founder Mackenzie Cowell, a 24-year-old who majored in biology in college, said amateurs will probably pursue serious work such as new vaccines and super-efficient biofuels, but they might also try, for example, to use squid genes to create tattoos that glow.

Cowell said such unfettered creativity could produce important discoveries.

"We should try to make science more sexy and more fun and more like a game," he said.

Patterson, the computer programmer, wants to insert the gene for fluorescence into yogurt bacteria, applying techniques developed in the 1970s.

She learned about genetic engineering by reading scientific papers and getting tips from online forums. She ordered jellyfish DNA for a green fluorescent protein from a biological supply company for less than $100. And she built her own lab equipment, including a gel electrophoresis chamber, or DNA analyzer, which she constructed for less than $25, versus more than $200 for a low-end off-the-shelf model.

Jim Thomas of ETC Group, a biotechnology watchdog organization, warned that synthetic organisms in the hands of amateurs could escape and cause outbreaks of incurable diseases or unpredictable environmental damage.

"Once you move to people working in their garage or other informal location, there's no safety process in place," he said.

Some also fear that terrorists might attempt do-it-yourself genetic engineering. But Patterson said: "A terrorist doesn't need to go to the DIYbio community. They can just enroll in their local community college."


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Wax
#8 Posted : 8/11/2013 4:21:15 AM

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I believe it could be done, but the problem would lie in the amount of DMT you could produce compared to the amount of effort and cost of copious amounts of amino acids to feed the bacteria on. It would be a great fun science project, but would the return be worth it?

I think if the nexus were to embark on any sort of quest to produce large amounts of DMT within reasonable terms we should look more into the hybridization of grasses or other plants which naturally produce our wonder buddy. It may take a while to get plants producing large quantities, but it would be essentially free and we could probably achieve the desired outcome much faster than creating g.e. yeast with a high yield. Plus we wouldn't run the risk of creating a super virus that kicks off the zombie apocalypse (you saw how close they came with those RC's!) Pleased
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