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Psychedelic Insects? Options
 
idtravlr
#1 Posted : 7/4/2009 11:56:43 AM

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This is a really random question, but does anyone know of any insects with psychedelic properties, or even any studies of this sort? I find it interesting that we have psychedelics of Fungi, Plant, and Animal (I think only amphibian). It seems to me that there must be insects containing psychedelic compounds, but I've never heard of such thing, or even any research surrounding it. Anyone have any info on this subject?

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Phlux-
#2 Posted : 7/4/2009 12:04:46 PM

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scorpion venom - not really an insect tho, loads of animals from fish to cobra's and birds apparently.
I recon its almost guarenteed insects will have some too but how does that help us - plants/fungi are always the best source of entheogens.
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PsilocybeChild
#3 Posted : 7/4/2009 12:57:59 PM

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There's a species of psychoactive ants
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Bancopuma
#4 Posted : 7/4/2009 2:26:14 PM

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I heard there was a species of grub used by an Amazonian tribe for its visual and opium like properties...that tribe may be extinct though now and the species has been lost, not sure though.

Also I think bee venom - and sometimes honey - has been employed as a visionary agent in some traditions.
 
fourthripley
#5 Posted : 7/4/2009 9:12:04 PM
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I think the head part of a bamboo worm is puported to cause visions when eaten, tucked away in Ott's Pharmacotheon.
mistakes were made
 
psychosisdoses
#6 Posted : 7/4/2009 9:32:44 PM

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i have also heard of psychoactive honey... the bees feed on tropane containing plants and this is made into honey containing tropane alkaloids..

my friend told me that once he was stung by a hornet 7 times in the elbow and that he got high from it.. colors brighter and euphoria... i dunno maybe it was in his head
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fourthripley
#7 Posted : 7/4/2009 10:33:25 PM
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fourthripley wrote:
I think the head part of a bamboo worm is puported to cause visions when eaten, tucked away in Ott's Pharmacotheon.


Myelobia smerintha http://www.think-aboutit.com/thinker/index.php/reality/178-reality/760-a-pointer-to-a-new-hallucinogen-of-insect-origin-

Quote:
A Pointer to a New Hallucinogen of Insect Origin

E.B. Britton

27 Galway Place, Deakin, Canberra ACT 2600 (Australia)

(Accepted August 28, 1984)






The purpose of this note is to draw attention to a long forgotten observa-
tion which points to the existence of a new hallucinogen, unique in that its
source is an insect.
Augustin de Saint-Hilaire (1779-1853) travelled extensively in eastern
Brazil between 1816 and 1823 and after his return to France published
valuable observations on the geography, ethnology and natural history of the
country. In two of his unpublished works Saint-Hilaire (1824, republished
Jenkins, 1946, p. 49; 1830, pp. 432-433) described the use of an insect as
food and medicine by the Malalis, natives in the Brazilian province of Minas
Gerais.
The relevant passage (1824) (translated) is as follows:

When I was among the Malalis, in the province of Mines, they spoke much of a grub
which they regarded as a delicious food, and which is called bicho de tacuara (bamboo-
worm), because it is found in the stems of bamboos, but only when these bear flowers.
Some Portugese who have lived among the Indians value these worms no less than the
natives themselves; they melt them on the fire, forming them into an oily mass, and
so preserve them for use in the preparation of food. The Malalis consider the head of
the bicho de tacuara as a dangerous poison; but all agree in saying that this creature,
dried and reduced to powder constitutes a powerful vulnerary (for the healing of
wounds). If one is to believe these Indians and the Portugese themselves it is not only
for this use that the former preserve the bicho de tacuara . When strong emotion makes
them sleepless, they swallow, they say, one of these worms dried, without the head
but with the intestinal tube; and then they fall into a kind of ecstatic sleep, which often
lasts more than a day, and similar to that experienced by the Orientals when they take
opium in excess. They tell, on awakening, of marvellous dreams; they saw splendid
forests, they ate delicious fruits, they killed without difficulty the most choice game;
but these Malalis add that they take care to indulge only rarely in this debilitating
kind of pleasure. I saw them only with the bicho de tacuara dried and without heads;
but during a botanical trip that I made to Saint-Francois with my Botocudo, this
young man found a great many of these grubs in flowering bamboos, and set about
eating them in my presence. He broke open the creature and carefully removed the
head and intestinal tube, and sucked out the soft whitish substance which re-
mained in the skin. In spite of my repugnance, I followed the example of the young
savage, and found, in this strange food, an extremely agreeable flavour which recalled
that of the most delicate cream.
If then, as I can hardly doubt, the account of the Malalis is true, the narcotic
property of the bicho de tacuara resides solely in the intestinal tube, since the sur-
rounding fat produces no ill effect. Be that as it may, I submitted to M. Latreille the
description of the animal I had made, and this learned entomologist recognised
it as a caterpillar probably belonging to the genus 'Cossus' or to the genus 'Hepiale'.

These observations are repeated in Saint-Hilaire (1839, pp. 432-433) with
the addition of the information that the "bicho de taquara" are half as long
as the index finger.
The intoxicating effect of the larvae from bamboo has apparently been
forgotten in Brazil and the seven volume Handbook of South American
Indians (Steward, 1946-1959) while referring briefly to the observation of
Saint-Hilaire in Vol. 5 (p. 557) gives no additional references. This is perhaps
not surprising as the Malalis were a near-coastal tribe long ago overrun by the
advance of civilisation. The name "bicho de taquara" is, however, still in use
and according to Ihering (1932, p. 236) and Costa Lima (1936, p. 266;
1967, p. 246) refers to the larva of the moth Myelobia (Morpheis) smerintha
Huebner (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae : Crambinae).
Costa Lima (1967, p. 246) states that the larvae feed in common bamboos
including Nastes (=Nastus) barbatus Trin., "taquara lixa" (Merostachys
Rideliana Rupr.), "taquara poca" (Merostachys Neesii Rupr.) and "taquaras-
su" (Guadua sp.) (Hoehne, F.C. et al.). The larvae feed inside the internodes
of the bamboo and attain a maximum length of about 10 cm. The moth
emerges in September and has frequently appeared in plague proportions.
There are 24 species of Myelobia in South America, one in Mexico and one
in Guatemala. The statement by Saint-Hilaire that the larvae are only found
when the bamboo is in flower probably means that the host bamboos flower
annually (as do a number of Brazilian species) and it is at that time that the
larvae reach their maximum size. As the adult moth emerges in September
this is probably in July or August.
It appears from the observations of Saint-Hilaire that the active substance
is not destroyed by drying, and the need to remove the head and gut to
avoid intoxication suggests that it is contained in the salivary glands. The
active material could therefore be concentrated initially by removing the
head plus salivary glands and part of the gut, discarding the rest of the body.
In view of the interest in the pharmacology of hallucinogens and the
medicinal use of the dried and powdered larvae it would seem to be woth-
while to investigate what appears to be a new source, and as the insect is
large and common it would be well suited to biochemical study. It is of
particular interest that this would be the first hallucinogen of insect origin.


References
Costa Lima, A.M. da (1936) Terceir Catalogo do Insetos qui vivem nas plantas da Brasil,
Directoria de Estatistica da Producao, Rio de Janeiro.
Costa Lima, A.M. da (1967) Quarto catalogo dos insetos qui vivem nas plantos de Brasil;
seus parasitos e predatores. Rio de Janeiro, Ministerio de Agricultura, Departamento
de Defesa e Inspecas Agropecuaria, Servico de Defesa Sanitaria Vegetal, Laboratorio
Centralde Patolgia Vegetal.
Ihering, R. von (1917) Observacoes sobre a mariposa Myelobia smerintha Hubn. em S.
Paulo. Physis (Buenos Aires) 3, 60-68.
Ihering, R. von (196Cool Diccionario dos Animaes do Brasil, Sao Paulo, Editora Universi-
dade Brasilia, pp. 147-148.
Jenkins, Anna (Ed.) (1946) Chronica Botanica 10, 24-61 (a reprint of Saint-Hilaire,
1824).
Saint-Hilaire, Augustin F.C.P. de (1824) Histoire du Plantes les plus remarquables du
Bresil et du Paraguay.
Saint-Hilaire, Augustin F.C.P. de (1830) Voyages dans l'interieur du Bresil - Premiere
Partie. Voyage dans les provinces de Rio de Janiero et de Minas Gerais, Paris.
Steward, Julian H. (Ed.) (1946-1959) Handbook of South American Indians, 7 Vols.
Vol. 5. The Comparitive Ethnology of South American Indians Prepared in coopera-
tion with the U.S. Dept. of State as a project of the Interdepartmental Committe
on Scientific and Cultural Cooperation. U.S. Govt. Printing Office,
mistakes were made
 
arimane
#8 Posted : 7/5/2009 2:27:58 AM

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what about the worms of the san pedro - peyote, these used in the mezcal alcoholic brew?

I've heard about it, don't know nothing sure
Bad, bad english
 
MagikVenom
#9 Posted : 7/5/2009 3:03:32 AM

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Grubs the buzz is in the head the locals pop off the head for a meal leve it on for a trip

there is a lizard species that has DMT

also the venom of sea snakes is thought by some to have properties that mirror many of the effects psychedelics


what about the worms of the san pedro - peyote, these used in the mezcal alcoholic brew?

well its a myth please correct if wrong I have eaten many many worms NOTHING but drunk.Cool
 
idtravlr
#10 Posted : 7/5/2009 10:33:27 AM

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Wow, great feedback guys! This bamboo grub is quite interesting. I'd be curious to find out if further study has been done to determine what the active hallucinogenic agent might be (if it's rumored properties are truly fact, and not fable), and if it's a true psychedelic and not just a deliriant. I'll have to do some more research on this topic. Thanks for the link fourthripley!

PsilocybeChild - Now that you mention it, I think I do recall reading something long ago about a psychoactive ant as well. I thought it offered more sedative / narcotic effects though, and not psychedelic... I certainly could be mistaken however.

I'm interested in this topic NOT because I'm necessarily interested in seeking out and ingesting psychedelic insects, but rather to further my study of the purpose of psychedelics on this planet, and the likelihood of their existence as "by chance" or "by design". It's interesting to me that most (if not all) true psychedelics only come from renewable (do not have to be killed) sources. If these grubs, or other insects do in fact contain true psychedelic substances, then this just opens up more questions about the theories of their true purpose, if there even is a true purpose...

Interesting stuff regardless!

Peace
-idt
I am not a drug addict seeking escape from reality. I am an explorer of consciousness challenging consensus reality.

…is DMT dangerous? The answer is only if you fear death by astonishment… [crowd laughter]… Remember how you laughed when this possibility was raised… a moment will come that will wipe the smile right off your face.
-Terence McKenna
 
Fatcat
#11 Posted : 7/7/2009 1:59:16 AM

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I do not think that cacti worms would contain mescaline. I recall hearing that mescaline is used as a bug repellent by the cacti. Also there is a sponge that contains 5-bromine-DMT or something like that.
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blue_velvet
#12 Posted : 7/19/2009 3:02:06 AM

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Lemurs get high on millipedes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMPOaVyX3UE
 
idtravlr
#13 Posted : 7/19/2009 3:26:30 AM

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[quote=blue_velvet]Lemurs get high on millipedes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMPOaVyX3UE[/quote]
Holy shit! That is an amazing video blue_velvet!! Thanks for sharing! I wonder if the millipede venom would intoxicate a human too, or if it would just make us sick, or kill us.

Peace
-idt
I am not a drug addict seeking escape from reality. I am an explorer of consciousness challenging consensus reality.

…is DMT dangerous? The answer is only if you fear death by astonishment… [crowd laughter]… Remember how you laughed when this possibility was raised… a moment will come that will wipe the smile right off your face.
-Terence McKenna
 
brettoner
#14 Posted : 7/22/2009 8:56:04 PM
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under files look for "Encyclopedia of Mind Enhancing Foods, Drugs and Nutritional Substances" i think they have some thing about insects in there under ethogens
 
endlessness
#15 Posted : 7/22/2009 9:56:13 PM

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arimane wrote:
what about the worms of the san pedro - peyote, these used in the mezcal alcoholic brew?

I've heard about it, don't know nothing sure


the worms that they put in the mezcal brew is not from san pedro or peyote.. It lives in some agave cactus, which does not contain mescaline. The name mezcal is not related to mescaline.

but yeah I also wonder about insects that could make humans high Very happy

not really insect, but I've heard of psychoactive honey also
 
MagikVenom
#16 Posted : 7/22/2009 11:05:20 PM

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Lemurs get high on millipedes

That is interesting they dont use tools per say but they know how to repel insects and get a buzz at the same time. Dont let this get out they may try to make millipedes illegal and in turn destroy the natural eco system for the lemurs. Hmmmm that sound familiar.

Those big millipedes have a very strong smell I never knew they were toxic but I gently held them in my hand and they seem docile to me but I like things that scare most people they are not harmful and have a place like me and you.

I think they starting putting agave worms in so you would know it was made from agave and not some distilled sugar cane or rice or other crap humans use to make rot gut booze. I have eaten maybe a 50 worms one at a time.


MV
 
SKA
#17 Posted : 10/21/2009 11:35:02 PM
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Yes but the Lemurs Bite and carress the milipedes. This triggers the release of toxins in the milipedes as a defence mechanism. The lemurs keep bitings the milipedes and rubbing them into their fur.
I guess you could make them feel threatened and collect/consume the toxins they excrete. But where would you find these milipedes?
 
twitchy
#18 Posted : 8/16/2019 9:46:13 PM

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psychosisdoses wrote:
i have also heard of psychoactive honey... the bees feed on tropane containing plants and this is made into honey containing tropane alkaloids..

my friend told me that once he was stung by a hornet 7 times in the elbow and that he got high from it.. colors brighter and euphoria... i dunno maybe it was in his head


I think it's a particular species of an otherwise highly toxic Rhododendron from Asia that the bees make honey from, supposed to be quite the inebriant. Here in southern Appalachia, honey that is suspected to contain local rhododendron is to be avoided. I wonder if the two species have similarities, or if this is specific to the Asian variety?
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