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Cluster Headaches & Endogenous DMT Options
 
Nathanial.Dread
#1 Posted : 2/24/2014 4:53:10 AM

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Blessings
~ND
"There are many paths up the same mountain."

 

STS is a community for people interested in growing, preserving and researching botanical species, particularly those with remarkable therapeutic and/or psychoactive properties.
 
ymer
#2 Posted : 2/24/2014 5:49:16 AM

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Well I'm just going to say that I have treated a couple of severe headaches that I've had with 5mg DMT, headache was completely gone in 5 minutes, it also worked with my mom and my GF.

DMT is pure magic Thumbs up
 
Infectedstyle
#3 Posted : 2/24/2014 12:56:38 PM

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Cranial vasoconstriction/dilation?

Yes.

On DMT i sometimes feel the vein on my neck.. Pulsating. Constricted.

Something about regulating blood pressure and blood flow? /rant..
 
corpus callosum
#4 Posted : 2/24/2014 2:03:04 PM

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Nathanial.Dread wrote:

It's commonly thought that psilocybin-induced vasoconstriction stops veins from pressing on the trigeminal nerve because psilocybin is a structural analogue of serotonin. It was suggested during the course of the conversation that it wasn't serotonin that was important, but rather, the endogenous DMT that psilocybin also looks like.

Is it possible that the role of endogenous DMT is to regulate cranial vasoconstriction/dilation? I know that there's no direct evidence of that, but it seemed like an idea worth putting out there.

Blessings
~ND


Although the pathogenesis of migraine is incompletely understood its not believed to be due to pressure on the trigeminal nerve; rather it involves pain receptors in the dura and associated vessels which feed back into the trigeminal nucleus in the brainstem with some aberrant input from the sphenopalatine ganglion. Its not only serotonin that's involved; it appears that glutamate is also involved, hence the benefits of topiramate in migraine via antagonism of the AMPA/kainate receptor subtypes.
I am paranoid of my brain. It thinks all the time, even when I'm asleep. My thoughts assail me. Murderous lechers they are. Thought is the assassin of thought. Like a man stabbing himself with one hand while the other hand tries to stop the blade. Like an explosion that destroys the detonator. I am paranoid of my brain. It makes me unsettled and ill at ease. Makes me chase my tail, freezes my eyes and shuts me down. Watches me. Eats my head. It destroys me.

 
Infectedstyle
#5 Posted : 2/24/2014 2:12:16 PM

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Wow corpus.. Thanks.. Those are going in my notes! I was wondering what the exact pathways for migraine could be.
 
Nathanial.Dread
#6 Posted : 2/24/2014 4:54:50 PM

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corpus callosum wrote:
Nathanial.Dread wrote:

It's commonly thought that psilocybin-induced vasoconstriction stops veins from pressing on the trigeminal nerve because psilocybin is a structural analogue of serotonin. It was suggested during the course of the conversation that it wasn't serotonin that was important, but rather, the endogenous DMT that psilocybin also looks like.

Is it possible that the role of endogenous DMT is to regulate cranial vasoconstriction/dilation? I know that there's no direct evidence of that, but it seemed like an idea worth putting out there.

Blessings
~ND


Although the pathogenesis of migraine is incompletely understood its not believed to be due to pressure on the trigeminal nerve; rather it involves pain receptors in the dura and associated vessels which feed back into the trigeminal nucleus in the brainstem with some aberrant input from the sphenopalatine ganglion. Its not only serotonin that's involved; it appears that glutamate is also involved, hence the benefits of topiramate in migraine via antagonism of the AMPA/kainate receptor subtypes.

Sorry, I mean cluster headaches, in which the trigeminal nerve is implicated, I believe.
"There are many paths up the same mountain."

 
corpus callosum
#7 Posted : 2/24/2014 5:32:33 PM

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Nathanial.Dread wrote:
Sorry, I mean cluster headaches, in which the trigeminal nerve is implicated, I believe.


The trigeminal nerve is implicated in both migraine and cluster headache and in both, as primary conditions, theres no evidence of nerve compression. The root of both ailments is largely related to the pars caudalis of the trigemincervical complex, the part of the trigeminal nerve sensory nucleus which runs from the pons down to about C3-4 of the cervical spine (bit of a mouthful!!). The role of both serotonin and glutamate relates to the effects of receptor agonism on ion channels such as sodium, chloride and calcium which alters membrane potentials across neurones and hence disordered firing.
I am paranoid of my brain. It thinks all the time, even when I'm asleep. My thoughts assail me. Murderous lechers they are. Thought is the assassin of thought. Like a man stabbing himself with one hand while the other hand tries to stop the blade. Like an explosion that destroys the detonator. I am paranoid of my brain. It makes me unsettled and ill at ease. Makes me chase my tail, freezes my eyes and shuts me down. Watches me. Eats my head. It destroys me.

 
Infectedstyle
#8 Posted : 2/25/2014 1:34:24 AM

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corpus callosum wrote:
Nathanial.Dread wrote:
Sorry, I mean cluster headaches, in which the trigeminal nerve is implicated, I believe.


The trigeminal nerve is implicated in both migraine and cluster headache and in both, as primary conditions, theres no evidence of nerve compression. The root of both ailments is largely related to the pars caudalis of the trigemincervical complex, the part of the trigeminal nerve sensory nucleus which runs from the pons down to about C3-4 of the cervical spine (bit of a mouthful!!). The role of both serotonin and glutamate relates to the effects of receptor agonism on ion channels such as sodium, chloride and calcium which alters membrane potentials across neurones and hence disordered firing.

Drool
 
 
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