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An Idea for A Collaborative Research Project Options
 
purple_dye
#1 Posted : 6/12/2012 8:02:54 PM

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This is a wonderful idea. We can list out all the topics that can potentially be covered and assign people to each topic (or groups of people). Those people can be "in charge" of that topic and take control of it.

For the TLDR people:

Post #2 - Listed out the items that need to be researched

Post #3 – Entropymancer - “It's such a great opportunity for newer and older members alike to really boost the level of info on the forum”

Post #10 - standard information – Snozzberry – “the root of everything we'll be looking at falls into three main disciplines: Botany, Chemistry and Anthropology” But be sure to note that not all info has a category!

And most important:

endlessness wrote:


To summarize for those checking the thread:

All you need to do to GREATLY help us in this community is search keywords and copy/paste information.

What keywords? The name of the plants in the list above. Appart from the plant names, you can search any or a mix of the following keywords: alkaloid, phytochemical, phytochemistry, ethnobotanical, pharmacology, history, toxicity, analysis, location, cultivation, etc etc

Where to search? The list of resources mentioned in the post above. Also a GREAT tool for accessing paid-only scientific articles for free is this: https://www.dmt-nexus.me...spx?g=posts&t=33134

Where to paste it? You can paste it directly to the Nexus Wiki, or make a word file and attach here.


You dont have to be an expert or even really understand all the information to do this. Please whoever reads this, let us know if you consider helping, so we know more or less how many people we can get help from. You dont need to sign your soul to it, but just let us know if once in a while you can spend some minutes/hours searching, copying and pasting info.



This link is very useful!


PS

This is what the alphabet would look like if Q and R were missing
 

Good quality Syrian rue (Peganum harmala) for an incredible price!
 
purple_dye
#2 Posted : 6/12/2012 8:08:35 PM

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From Nexus Wiki:

All Plants

Acacia acuminata
Acacia albida (Faidherbia albida)
Acacia angustifolia
Acacia auculiformis
Acacia baileyana
Acacia berlandieri
Acacia catechu
Acacia caven
Acacia colei
Acacia complanata
Acacia confusa
Acacia constricta
Acacia cornigera
Acacia cultriformis
Acacia difformis
Acacia farnesiana
Acacia filiciana
Acacia floribunda
Acacia laeta
Acacia longifolia
Acacia longifolia var. sophorae
Acacia maidenii
Acacia melanoxylon
Acacia mellifera
Acacia mucronata
Acacia neurophylla
Acacia nubica
Acacia obtusifolia
Acacia oerfota
Acacia oxycedrus
Acacia phlebophylla
Acacia podalyriaefolia
Acacia polyacantha
Acacia provincialis
Acacia retinodes
Acacia rigidula
Acacia senegal
Acacia simplicifolia
Acacia sieberiana
Acacia tortilis
Acacia victorae
Anadenanthera colubrina
Anadenanthera excelsa
Anadenanthera macrocarpa
Anadenanthera peregrina
Anthirhea lucida
Arundo donax
Banisteriopsis caapi (Caapi, Ayahuasca)
Brugmansia spp
Datura spp.
Delosperma acuminatum
Delosperma cooperi
Delosperma ecklonis
Delosperma esterhuyseniae
Delosperma harazianum
Delosperma hirtum
Delosperma klinghardiana
Delosperma lydenbergense
Delosperma pageanum
Delosperma pargamentaceum
Delosperma tradescantioides
Desmanthus illinoensis ---------------------- Purple Dye
Desmanthus leptolobus
Desmanthus velutinus
Desmodium caudatum
Desmodium gangeticum
Desmodium gyrans
Desmodium pulchellum
Desmodium triflorum
Diplopterys cabrerana (Chaliponga)
Evodia rutaecarpa
Justicia pectoralis
Lespedeza bicolor
[[Limona acidissima]
Lophophora Williamsii (Peyote)
Mimosa hostilis
Mimosa ophthalmocentra
[[Mimosa scabrella]
Mimosa verrucosa
Mucuna pruriens
Osteophloem platyspermum
Pandanus utilis
Pandanus odoratissima
Petalostylis labicheoides
Phalaris aquatica
Phalaris arundinacea (Reed canary grass)
Phalaris brachystachys
Phalaris canariensis
Phalaris minor
Phalaris paradoxa
Phalaris stenoptera
Phalaris tuberosa
Peganum harmala (Syrian rue)
Phragmites australis
Psychotria viridis (Chacruna)
Psychotria carthaginensis
Psychotria horizontalis
Psychotria marginala
Psychotria poeppigiana
Psychotria pychotriaefolia
Psychotria stenostachya
Salvia divinorum
Tabernanthe Iboga (Iboga)
Testulea gabonensis
Tetrapterys methystica -------------------------- Entropymancer
Trichocereus Pachanoi
Trichocereus Peruvianus
Vepris ampody
Virola calophylla
Virola calophylloidea
Virola carinata
Virola divergens
Virola elongata
Virola melinonii
Virola multinervia
Virola pavonis
Virola peruviana
Virola rufuta
Virola sebifera
Virola theiodora
Virola venosa
Zanthoxylum arborescens
Zanthoxylum procerum


I call Desmanthus illinoensis. *starts research*
PS

This is what the alphabet would look like if Q and R were missing
 
Entropymancer
#3 Posted : 6/12/2012 9:51:23 PM

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I'm all for this. I had planned to expand this effort into a larger organized set of projects if the "test run" with T. methystica goes well.

I notice a lot of introductions from new members talking about what a great wealth of information this site is. But when it comes down to quality reliable information (including citations so the info is verifiable) about the plants that concern us, it's mostly the same small group of users contributing.

I thought that this idea would help make the whole thing more egalitarian. Maybe some people are insecure about their writing abilities. Maybe they don't feel like they know enough about botany or chemistry to contribute. But everyone can copy-and-paste, and that's really all it takes to make projects like this work.

I envisioned us focusing mainly on the lesser-known plants. Things like peyotl or B. caapi would be messier since there are so many sources out there, including some good summaries of the literature. If I can turn up over 20 references for a little-known plant like Callaeum antifebrile in a few hours, I could see this approach to better-known plants getting really out of hand quickly.

I really hope this approach will work. It's such a great opportunity for newer and older members alike to really boost the level of info on the forum (I like that we're keeping it in the Open Discussion area so the threads are open to new users). My only concern at this point is whether enough people will want to participate; I'm glad to see Snozz got the ball rolling on T. methystica, but we'll need to see more members participating for this to be successful. If we could get a third of the people who view the thread to each spend twenty minutes digging up info, it would only take a day or two to generate an ample annotated bibliography.
 
purple_dye
#4 Posted : 6/13/2012 2:42:25 AM

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In this post I'm going to try to gather some standard information that should be researched for each plant.

(in no particular order)

1. Description
2. Medicinal uses
3. Cultivation
4. Alkaloid content
5. Identification
6. Common names
7. Geographical records
8. Literature citations
9. Nomenclature
10. History
11. Dangers
12. Culture

I knows there are a lot of other classifications.

Anyone have any suggestions?
PS

This is what the alphabet would look like if Q and R were missing
 
Entropymancer
#5 Posted : 6/13/2012 7:41:19 AM

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purple_dye wrote:
In this post I'm going to try to gather some standard information that should be researched for each plant...


I think it's great to outline a sort of standard organization scheme, but in a lot of ways it's putting the cart before the horse. I wouldn't worry too much about organizing the information until there is information to organize. As I've researched plants, I've found that a lot of information doesn't necessarily fit neatly into one category. I'll often include the same factoid from the same source in multiple sections or contexts. Or sometimes I'll tag a piece of information for one section, but I end up using it in a completely different section once I start writing.

To me, the real value of this collaborative research is in crowdsourcing the collection of information. Once that is done, someone who is interested in the particular topic can go through and organize the information into a neat summary.

For some of the categories you listed, it's convenient to target your research (for example, to find nomenclature and descriptions, you could use a botany database like tropicos.org). But when you're using Google Scholar or following up citations from references like Pharmacotheon, you're apt to encounter information from several categories. And if you find all of that information jumbled together, I say collect it all and sort it out later (maybe follow each quotation with a list of categories it might apply to, so it will be easier to sort out).


A few comments on the listed categories:

Quote:
8. Literature citations

I feel strongly that this should not be its own separate category. Sure, if you organize all the information that you've found into a summary article, you'll want to include a bibliography section.

But when you're researching, you don't just want to collect a list of sources that talk about the plant in question; you want to collect the information from those sources (and keep track of which information came from which source, so others can use your summary as a guide to the literature).

Quote:
9. Nomenclature
1. Description
5. Identification
7. Geographical records

I would group all of these categories into a single category: Botany. Each of the listed categories could be retained as separate sub-categories. Identification is sort of a redundant topic for most of the plants listed above, as the critical information for identifying them is contained in the botanical descriptions. I suppose you could include a dichotomous key for the genus, but it would take an awful lot of space to include this information in the summary for every species.

Since a lot of plant nomenclature is being reorganized as phylogenetic analysis tells us more about which species are related to each other, it would be nice to include a section discussing any relevant phylogenetic analysis that has been performed.

Quote:

3. Cultivation

Information on this can be quite sparse for poorly-studied jungle plants. If you can find it, definitely include it. I think this is a section where it is appropriate to cite forum posts (from the Nexus and/or other forums) by people who grow the plant. Often that's the only place to find information on growing some of the more obscure plants.

Quote:
2. Medicinal uses
12. Culture

I would combine these two into a single Tradition Use or Anthropology/Ethnobotany section. Often the medicinal uses are intimately tied with the cultural contexts in which they are employed. With visionary plants, the cures are often accomplished by using the plant to divine a non-material cause of the disease (predicated on belief in a particular type of non-material realm) or by using the plant as a means to ask spirits to intercede on behalf of the patient (predicated on a culturally-specific spiritual cosmology).

Quote:
4. Alkaloid content

Just something to think about: How much information should be included when discussing the chemistry of a plant? For common chemicals (DMT, harmine, etc.), it's tempting to simply say that (for a completely arbitrary example) the leaves contained 0.1% and the stems contained 0.04%, and maybe include a reference to TiHKAL or Trout's Notes. But for less common ones (some of the substituted β-carbolines like 6-MeO-2-Me-THβC) or ones unique to the plant (like the salvinorins, salvidivins, salvinicins, and divinatorins from S. divinorum) it clearly seems better to include a full set of data. Even for the more common chemicals like harmine, there aren't really any good resources on the internet that collect all that data into one place, so really it's a good idea to consider including a full entry for all important chemicals reported from the plant.

Then again, a full set of data would include: common name, IUPAC name, molecular formula, molar mass, exact molar mass, appearance, melting point, boiling point, pKa(s), XlogP, IR spectral data, UV spectral data, specific rotation, Rf (retention factor) values, mass spec data, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, references to crystallography, isolation procedures, synthesis procedures, receptor affinity/EC50/Emax data, and cliffnotes on the pharmacology.

That's a whole lot of stuff to track down, and that much information devoted to the chemistry could bog down an entry whose primary goal is to collect information on the plant. So maybe it would be better to just include data on what chemicals were reported at what concentrations from which portions of the plant, and link to a separate entry for the chemical data (which could easily be housed in the Nexus wiki, for example). I imagine that in a few years time, the Nexus could have its own Chemical Index database that surpasses Trout's Notes or the Shulgin Index.

Quote:
6. Common names

Definitely good to collect these into their own section. Just be sure to include citations for every name. Just look at Rätsch's Encyclopedia of Psychoactive Plants: his lists of common names are completely worthless; many of them are clearly from hearsay or are recent "slang" terms, and even with the traditional names you can't follow them back to the source and see what context they were reported in.

Quote:
10. History

This is another topic that requires a lot of careful consideration. It sounds simple enough to say "cover the history of the plant." But then you have to ask yourself: Which history? There are a lot of different ways to consider history. For example:

The history from the perspective of the indigenous people who use the plant: This is composed partly of creation myths, and partly of vague and contradictory tidbits of oral history. If multiple cultures used the plant, they will often have different sets of traditional "history" associated with it.

Archaeological history: Depending on the climate, there may be ancient samples of the plant that can be dated to give clues about its ancient history. Or if no samples of the plant have survived, there may still be paraphernalia associated with the plant that provide grounds to speculate on the history.

Botanical history: Phylogenetic analysis can provide information about the very ancient history of the plant (migration events, relation to other plants, etc.). Sometimes certain reproductive features can suggest information about the plant's history of being cultivated by humans.

Speculative history: The best example of this is the ancient soma complex. In discussing the fly agaric mushroom (or syrian rue, ephedra, various lotuses, cannabis, etc.), should you discuss the evidence that has been cited in favor of it being identified as soma? Should the history of ergot include a discussion of the Kykeon potion? Should a history of Salvia divinorum include a discussion of the Nahuatl plant pipiltzintzintli?

Western recorded history: Travelogues of early explorers or ethnobotanists give us yet another angle (i.e. the history of the plant's introduction to Western awareness). Often these are tied with the identification of the plant, but sometimes the accounts predate botanical identification, so some degree of speculation is involved. And what is the cutoff date for this Western-centric history? Should it include a history of the plant's rising reputation in the Western entheogenic subculture from the early psychedelic era of the 1960s (or earlier) through the modern age of the internet? Should it include a timeline of the published ethnobotanical literature that introduced the plant to Western audiences, or should that information stay in the Anthropology/Ethnobotany section? Should it chronologically include chemical investigations that clarified the nature of the drug to Western audiences, or should that be incorporated into the Chemistry section?





This is all just food for thought. At this stage, I think simply collecting the information is more important than figuring out how to organize it. I know from experience all of the considerations that go into organizing information from the literature into a clear summary. A lot of these things are stylistic choices that might be better left in the hands of the authors who wish to write the summaries. Then again, if we get organized and compile all of these entries into a DMT-Nexus Plant Index, it would be nice to have all entries organized into a standardized form.

But like I said at the beginning, this seems to be putting the cart before the horse. Let's first wait and see how successful we are in getting collaborative efforts going to collect the information.
 
purple_dye
#6 Posted : 6/13/2012 4:30:36 PM

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Entropymancer wrote:

As I've researched plants, I've found that a lot of information doesn't necessarily fit neatly into one category.
To me, the real value of this collaborative research is in crowdsourcing the collection of information. Once that is done, someone who is interested in the particular topic can go through and organize the information into a neat summary.

You make some very valid points and I tend to agree with you. I still think that listing out categories is a good idea though to help one generalize pertinent information. Sadly though, I can easily see this being a limiting factor.
Perhaps you’re right. A project of this nature should be conducted in steps.

1. Gather all and any information relating to the topic
2. Organize into catagories


Entropymancer wrote:

For some of the categories you listed, it's convenient to target your research (for example, to find nomenclature and descriptions, you could use a botany database like tropicos.org). But when you're using Google Scholar or following up citations from references like Pharmacotheon, you're apt to encounter information from several categories. And if you find all of that information jumbled together, I say collect it all and sort it out later (maybe follow each quotation with a list of categories it might apply to, so it will be easier to sort out).

This gives me another idea. Going to google scholar and typing in a few key words is often a great way for one to gather information. It may also be very helpful to list out some key sites that are tried and true in regards to valid information, making each source viable.

1. Pharmacotheon
2. Tropicos.org
3. Google scholar
4. Pub med
5. Others?
PS

This is what the alphabet would look like if Q and R were missing
 
Entropymancer
#7 Posted : 6/13/2012 4:55:53 PM

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purple_dye wrote:

This gives me another idea. Going to google scholar and typing in a few key words is often a great way for one to gather information. It may also be very helpful to list out some key sites that are tried and true in regards to valid information, making each source viable.

1. Pharmacotheon
2. Tropicos.org
3. Google scholar
4. Pub med
5. Others?


Already workin' on it Thumbs up

Might not finish it this morning, but it should definitely be up by this evening
 
endlessness
#8 Posted : 6/13/2012 8:55:25 PM

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Thanks for the effort so far Smile

To summarize for those checking the thread:

All you need to do to GREATLY help us in this community is search keywords and copy/paste information.

What keywords? The name of the plants in the list above. Appart from the plant names, you can search any or a mix of the following keywords: alkaloid, phytochemical, phytochemistry, ethnobotanical, pharmacology, history, toxicity, analysis, location, cultivation, etc etc

Where to search? The list of resources mentioned in the post above. Also a GREAT tool for accessing paid-only scientific articles for free is this: https://www.dmt-nexus.me...spx?g=posts&t=33134

Where to paste it? You can paste it directly to the Nexus Wiki, or make a word file and attach here.


You dont have to be an expert or even really understand all the information to do this. Please whoever reads this, let us know if you consider helping, so we know more or less how many people we can get help from. You dont need to sign your soul to it, but just let us know if once in a while you can spend some minutes/hours searching, copying and pasting info.




One question: Would it be useful/good idea to have a list of plants that are priorities?
 
oden
#9 Posted : 6/13/2012 9:54:31 PM

odin the one


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SnozzleBerry
#10 Posted : 6/13/2012 11:18:37 PM

omnia sunt communia!

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Good stuff here...I plan on continuing to plunk away at the various ayahuasca constituents for the time being as that's what I find most intriguing (especially given the huge question marks for some of the species). I agree with a lot of what Entro said re: data dumps and also not overly dividing categories (imo, the root of everything we'll be looking at falls into three main disciplines: Botany, Chemistry and Anthropology). I'm kind of tied up at the moment, but I hope to be able to put in some real time before the end of the weekend and have at least one or two fun things to share with you guys Smile

endlessness wrote:
One question: Would it be useful/good idea to have a list of plants that are priorities?

I think this would be good for a number of reasons...at the bare minimum just to see whose focus is where.
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Entropymancer
#11 Posted : 6/14/2012 6:45:42 AM

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Entropymancer wrote:
purple_dye wrote:

This gives me another idea. Going to google scholar and typing in a few key words is often a great way for one to gather information. It may also be very helpful to list out some key sites...


Already workin' on it Thumbs up


And it's done: Guide to Researching Psychoactive Plants: Helpful Resources
 
purple_dye
#12 Posted : 6/14/2012 7:21:59 AM

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Welcome aboard the team oden! Any particular item that you are interested in finding some links for?


I hope snozzleberry doesn't mind me quoting a private conversation we had but:

SnozzleBerry wrote:
there are a lot of people and a lot of discussions going on right now about these sorts of projects and its great to have dialogue/know who is interested in engaging with what.


This got me thinking that perhaps we could start a list of people who are interested in actively building the nexus. Given that these people are willing and have stated this intention, we could start a list and use it as a reference of contact for various prospects. Of course those people are not committed to anything, but it would give them an opportunity. An opportunity to be part of our team. This would help both new and old members alike to gather together and form otherwise non-existent bonds/friendships and strengthen community in general.

Let me know what you guys think of this idea.

If its a hit then I'll use this or one of the above posts to start a list.
PS

This is what the alphabet would look like if Q and R were missing
 
oden
#13 Posted : 6/14/2012 9:44:15 AM

odin the one


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yes so we are not hunting the same things.
Just pick where or what group where you would like me to start and i will be happy to get my reaserch on!
Phalaris maby? what do you think?

I love this place and its members so HIT ME!
 
endlessness
#14 Posted : 6/14/2012 3:42:46 PM

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Ok so Im gonna make a preliminary version of what I consider a priority, feel free to disagree and remove, add, etc.

Main plants to gather info about:
Tetrapterys methystica and related plants ( https://www.dmt-nexus.me...amp;m=355570#post355570 )
Alicia anisopetala and related plants ( https://www.dmt-nexus.me...amp;m=355546#post355546 )
Banisteriopsis spp. (meaning all other plants of this genus appart from caapi)
Less known ayahuasca admixtures (Tabernaemontana sananho, Other Psychotria spp, etc)
Diplopterys cabrerana
Delosperma spp.
Desmanthus spp.
Mimosa spp. (all appart from hostilis)

What else?

I did NOT include Acacia for the moment because nen is dedicated to it, and I doubt someone can do a better job at the moment than him (but maybe he wants someone to help him with specific things? ). I neither added phalaris because the festi and samorini publication and the phalaris way of the future thread, which are linked in my signature phalaris link, already have tons of it, and what we need now is more practical work for phalaris I think (growing specific cuttings/seeds, extracting, testing).

 
purple_dye
#15 Posted : 6/14/2012 3:51:19 PM

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Hey end,

I just want to point out something mentioned earlier:

Entropymancer wrote:

I envisioned us focusing mainly on the lesser-known plants. Things like peyotl or B. caapi would be messier since there are so many sources out there, including some good summaries of the literature. If I can turn up over 20 references for a little-known plant like Callaeum antifebrile in a few hours, I could see this approach to better-known plants getting really out of hand quickly.


Do we can to put items like Mimosa and Banisteriopsis on the list of priorities?
PS

This is what the alphabet would look like if Q and R were missing
 
endlessness
#16 Posted : 6/14/2012 4:06:26 PM

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I made a small edit. I didnt mean B. caapi or M. hostilis since indeed those are major plants and theres already plenty of literature.. I meant the other related plants, since there are for example different Mimosas out there around the world that, if containing DMT, could be very handy to know. And as for the other Banisteriopsis, I thought that, appart from caapi, related plants might be interesting to investigate since they are often sold/ingested as "ayahuasca", and may be useful for our research regarding the Tetrapterys and Alicia genus too. What do you think?
 
purple_dye
#17 Posted : 6/14/2012 5:08:01 PM

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the nexus forum is not formatted to include docx files. If anyone else runs into this issue: http://www.docx2doc.com/ is a fast easy way to make your file uploadable.
PS

This is what the alphabet would look like if Q and R were missing
 
SnozzleBerry
#18 Posted : 6/14/2012 8:31:31 PM

omnia sunt communia!

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Two critiques, if I may...

First, it would be nice to have things immediately viewable on the forum, even if you choose to include an identical attachment as well. Obviously, this is just my personal preference, but it's much simpler to just scroll through a thread and be able to search things at a glance or with 'ctrl + f' and see the dialogues in addition to the actual information contained within the postings...which brings me to my next critique (and please don't take this one as me being harsh, it is again just my personal opinion)

There's nothing in that file...I can get the exact same information by typing "Desmanthus illinoensis" into google scholar (it could be argued that scholar gives even more information as it provides a sentence or two from each article). This doesn't give an idea of what relevant information is in any of the articles and under which of the ABC disciplines it might fall (Anthropology, Botany, Chemistry Razz) beyond the information gleaned from the titles. I would posit that this doesn't provide any workable information as someone still has to read through each of those articles just to get an idea of what information might be contained in them.

I would point to posts #2 and #3 in this thread to get an idea of the sort of stuff that could be excerpted from any articles that a person feels are relevant to the task at hand. By including excerpts that give a decent feel of the relevant information contained within the articles for which bibliographical information is given, you not only provide others with the ability to determine the merits of a given article for their research purposes, you also add to the information included within a thread that could be synthesized at a glance in the event someone wanted to create a summary of what is known/needs to be learned at any given point in a thread's life.

For instance, in the post I made in the thread that I used as an example, the excerpts from the two articles I included which state that Schultes dropped his T. methystica sample in a river and that a 2006 paper that combed the literature quite thoroughly as the method for compiling the information contained therein had no records of phytochemical analysis for T. methystica, someone can conclude at a glance, that there is a high probability that T. methystica has not been chemically analyzed before. Or from Entro's post in that example, you can get a full picture of the morphology of T. methystica without having to search for a single paper or download an attachment.

Sorry for the long-winded explanation, just wanted to share my thoughts on the matter. As I said, don't take these as harsh criticisms, they're just some thoughts and personal preferences that I feel wold go a long way in maximizing the efficiency of this collaborative research Smile
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oden
#19 Posted : 6/15/2012 7:31:40 AM

odin the one


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endlessness wrote:
Ok so Im gonna make a preliminary version of what I consider a priority, feel free to disagree and remove, add, etc.

Main plants to gather info about:
Tetrapterys methystica and related plants ( https://www.dmt-nexus.me...amp;m=355570#post355570 )
Alicia anisopetala and related plants ( https://www.dmt-nexus.me...amp;m=355546#post355546 )
Banisteriopsis spp. (meaning all other plants of this genus appart from caapi)
Less known ayahuasca admixtures (Tabernaemontana sananho, Other Psychotria spp, etc)
Diplopterys cabrerana
Delosperma spp.
Desmanthus spp.
Mimosa spp. (all appart from hostilis)

What else?

I did NOT include Acacia for the moment because nen is dedicated to it, and I doubt someone can do a better job at the moment than him (but maybe he wants someone to help him with specific things? ). I neither added phalaris because the festi and samorini publication and the phalaris way of the future thread, which are linked in my signature phalaris link, already have tons of it, and what we need now is more practical work for phalaris I think (growing specific cuttings/seeds, extracting, testing).


got it ..thank you..oden
 
old_one_001
#20 Posted : 3/27/2013 7:26:47 PM

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I am also interested in helping. I don't have time at the moment to read through this entire post, but I skimmed through and got the gist of what you are are working on. I will be putting some effort into this. I was also wondering, what about psychological research? I'm about to go search for a thread in regards to that, but just in case one doesn't exist, maybe we need to start one. Just a thought.
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