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Passifloras of Interest..(& MAOI plant Flavonoids) Options
 
nen888
#41 Posted : 3/23/2012 5:14:11 AM
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..i've attached below the most comprehensive table of passiflora phytochemical constituents (flavonoids, glycosides etc.) that i have found to date, from Passiflora: a review update [Kamaldeep Dhawana, Sanju Dhawanb, Anupam Sharmab; Journal of Ethnopharmacology Volume 94, Issue 1, Sept 2004, Pages 1–23 http://www.mendeley.com/researc...-a-review-update/#page-1]
..it is not complete, however, as it doesn't include Neu's 1954 findings of harman in a number of species (P. actinea, P. alba, P. byronoides, P. capsularis, P. eichleriana, P. quadrangularis, P. suberosa and P. warmingii, see earlier in thread) and leaves detail of incarnata and edulis for the main paper.. this paper outlines the various medicinal actions observed in passionflowers incl. anxiolytic, anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory..
such a fertile genus..
.
EDIT ps. a reminder that cyanogenic glycosides, while potentially toxic, are broken down/destroyed by prolonged heating /boiling or drying of plant material..BTW not all glycosides are toxic, some are potentially therapeutic..
nen888 attached the following image(s):
passiflora phtyo-constituents 1.jpg (236kb) downloaded 433 time(s).
passiflora phyto-constituents 2.jpg (244kb) downloaded 437 time(s).
passiflora phyto-constituets 3.jpg (157kb) downloaded 429 time(s).
 

STS is a community for people interested in growing, preserving and researching botanical species, particularly those with remarkable therapeutic and/or psychoactive properties.
 
Hyperdimensional Cuttlefish
#42 Posted : 3/27/2012 2:45:25 AM

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Those toxic compounds are due to the cyanide containing glycosides. Correct?

Larger doses of B12 and a food high in glucose should go a long way to counteract the elevated blood levels of cyanide. I think.

Your mileage may vary, proceed at your own risk etc etc.
All these posts are on behalf of Stimpy, my yellow bullhead. He is an adventurous fish, and I feel his exploits are worth sharing...so much so, I occasionally forget that HE is the one who does these things. Sometimes I get caught in the moment and write of his experiences in the first person; this is a mistake, for I am an upstanding citizen who never does wrong. Stimpy is the degenerate.
 
nen888
#43 Posted : 3/27/2012 11:58:31 AM
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..that's right Hyperdimensional Cuttlefish, the possible toxicity would depend on the amount of
hydrogen cynanide present..HCN is destroyed by either prolonged boiling in water, or basic conditions (above pH8 ) ..the cyanide is oxidized to nitrogen gas and carbonate ion..it isn't present in dried material..
.
ps. species in the above list could contain alkaloids but not have screened for them..
 
nen888
#44 Posted : 3/27/2012 2:44:56 PM
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..i noted on the list the reference for Harman in Passiflora bryonioides..
this is a very rare US species (grown by horticultural enthusiasts) native to southern Arizona/northern Mexico, found on rocky outcrops in gullies..it's flower is quite small (c. 2-3cm diameter) and the leaves slightly hairy..
nen888 attached the following image(s):
Passiflora bryonioides 1.jpg (106kb) downloaded 387 time(s).
Passiflora bryonioides 2.jpg (111kb) downloaded 386 time(s).
 
MelCat
#45 Posted : 3/27/2012 4:06:17 PM

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WoW nen!!! Soooo much great information in this thread! THANK YOU for all of your efforts in this area!
Convert a melodic element into a rhythmic element...
 
xantho
#46 Posted : 3/30/2012 9:05:00 PM

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I came across some more interesting info on P. edulis while reading yesterday:

Deng et al. (2010) carried out assays on mice to evaluate the anxiolytic (anxiety reducing) and sedative activity of Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa. Flavicarpa is known as a variety of Passiflora edulis, however, the authors note a number of factors which point towards flavicarpa being a different species.

Quote:
Conclusions: The aerial part of Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa was anxiolytic at low dose but sedative at high dose. Flavonoids are important active constituents. Since AE [aqueous extract] contained little flavonoids, it was conjectured that there were other components responsible for the anxiolytic effect of Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa besides flavonoids.


The authors refer to a study by Santos et al. (2005) who put forward the idea that saponins might be the active substances in Passiflora actinia inducing the sedative-cataleptic activity. It is thought that these saponins might be responsible for the anxiolytic effects of P. edulis.

In addition, Coleta et al. (2006) "reported that the aqueous extract of Passiflora edulis possessed anxiolytic-like activity and flavonoids were one kind of its active components."

Deng et al. conclude that P. edulis and P. edulis f. flavicarpa have significant differences in their chemical composition.

Coleta, M., Batista, M.T., Campos, M.G., Carvalho, R., Cotrim, M.D., Lima, T.C., Cunha, A.P., 2006. Neuropharmacological evaluation of the putative anxiolytic effects of Passiflora edulis Sims, its sub-fractions and flavonoid constituents. Phytotherapy Research 20, 1067–1073.

Deng, J., Zhou, Y., Bai, M., Li, H., & Li, L. (2010). Anxiolytic and sedative activities of Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 128(1), 148-53. doi:10.1016/j.jep.2009.12.043

Santos, K.C., Santos, C.A.M., De Oliceira, R.M.W., 2005. Passiflora actinia Hooker extracts and fractions induce catalepsy in mice. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 100, 306–309.

"Becoming a person of the plants is not a learning process, it is a remembering process. Somewhere in our ancestral line, there was someone that lived deeply connected to the Earth, the Elements, the Sun, Moon and Stars. That ancestor lives inside our DNA, dormant, unexpressed, waiting to be remembered and brought back to life to show us the true nature of our indigenous soul" - Sajah Popham.
 
ntwhtyouknw
#47 Posted : 3/30/2012 11:46:22 PM

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Im trying to find out what type of Passiflora this is, picked it up at a nursery last week. He called it a burgundy Passion Vine, not to be confusednwith the red vine. Couldnt find out the latin name, my hopes are to find out the latin term so maybe I can learn more about the alkaloid profile. Any help is greatly appreciated.
ntwhtyouknw attached the following image(s):
20120323_155347.jpg (1,531kb) downloaded 370 time(s).
Toadfreak!

Travel like a king
Listen to the inner voice
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Conquering the stumbling blocks come easier
When the conqueror is in tune with the infinite
Every ending is a new beginning
Life is an endless unfoldment
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xantho
#48 Posted : 3/31/2012 11:37:05 AM

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I'm no expert but after a bit of Google searching it appears to me that you may have a Passiflora 'Lady Margaret' (a hybrid of Passiflora coccinea and Passiflora incarnata...and a gorgeous one at that!). nen or one of the others should be able to confirm or deny my educated guess. Below is some more info:

Quote:
Passiflora 'Lady Margaret' Deep blood red is a rare color among these tropical vines which sport some of the most exotic flower architecture in the world. This one, ‘Lady Margaret,’ is a hybrid between two South American species, the red Passiflora coccinea and the deciduous native of the American southeast, Passiflora incarnata. An evergreen vine, it features dark-green, lobed leaves arranged alternately on thin, ridged stems. The vines climb by tendrils produced in the leaf axils (joint between the leaves and stems.

Beautiful, raspberry to red flowers appear all year, though most heavily summer through fall. The complex, bowl-shaped flowers are composed of a white fleshy stigma surrounded by thick stamens, a fringe of red filaments with white tips and bases called the corona and many red petals and sepals. Its aggressive growth soon covers structures or other plants.

It prefers to grow in full sun but will tolerate light shade for a short portion of the day. Well-drained soil is essential or grow it in containers where not hardy. Passion flower vines can be weedy, spreading by suckers and rooted stems; in some areas it is considered an invasive plant. It is the host and larval food for several butterfly species which can lead to the leaves looking tattered and chewed. Grow ‘Lady Margaret’ as a ground cover, or on trellises and other supports for the lovely flowers and abundance of butterflies it attracts.


It seems that there is a fair degree of variation in color, from blood red to purple. I hope this information helps you.

"Becoming a person of the plants is not a learning process, it is a remembering process. Somewhere in our ancestral line, there was someone that lived deeply connected to the Earth, the Elements, the Sun, Moon and Stars. That ancestor lives inside our DNA, dormant, unexpressed, waiting to be remembered and brought back to life to show us the true nature of our indigenous soul" - Sajah Popham.
 
nen888
#49 Posted : 4/1/2012 10:05:44 AM
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..great work xantho, thanks for the contribution..Smile and thanks for bringing the lady to our attention with nice picture Toadfreak1..Very happy

now, with that pedigree (& having safely tried both parent species) i would sure be curious as to what the effects of
'Lady Margaret' would be..i want one myself now..
.
 
ntwhtyouknw
#50 Posted : 4/1/2012 12:29:08 PM

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I'm saving all the flower tops and some leaves for a rainy day. which part do you think is moar potent, flowers or leaves?
Toadfreak!

Travel like a king
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A higher wisdom is at work for you
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When the conqueror is in tune with the infinite
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Change your mind, and you change your relation to time
Free your mind and the rest will follow
 
nen888
#51 Posted : 4/1/2012 1:42:58 PM
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..^in the case of the parent species, leaves and stem...
 
nen888
#52 Posted : 4/2/2012 7:28:14 AM
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..here's Passiflora warmingii, synonymous with Passiflora morifolia, found in Argentina, Paraguay and Chile..
found to contain Harman by Neu 1954..also known as 'Blue Sweet Calabash" and Woodland Passionflower..
nen888 attached the following image(s):
Passiflora.morifolia.jpg (116kb) downloaded 326 time(s).
Passiflora_morifolia:warmingii_fruits.jpg (35kb) downloaded 327 time(s).
 
ntwhtyouknw
#53 Posted : 4/2/2012 6:33:04 PM

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Those fruits look alien nen..
Toadfreak!

Travel like a king
Listen to the inner voice
A higher wisdom is at work for you
Conquering the stumbling blocks come easier
When the conqueror is in tune with the infinite
Every ending is a new beginning
Life is an endless unfoldment
Change your mind, and you change your relation to time
Free your mind and the rest will follow
 
ntwhtyouknw
#54 Posted : 4/8/2012 11:04:21 PM

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So I picked up a Passiflora biflora today. Will a photo when the buds go into bloom, looking for some info on the little gal now.
Toadfreak!

Travel like a king
Listen to the inner voice
A higher wisdom is at work for you
Conquering the stumbling blocks come easier
When the conqueror is in tune with the infinite
Every ending is a new beginning
Life is an endless unfoldment
Change your mind, and you change your relation to time
Free your mind and the rest will follow
 
xantho
#55 Posted : 4/10/2012 5:26:59 PM

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This is not a technical addition but I wanted to share this website I just stumbled upon: Passiflora Online. It seems that it holds more horticultural information than chemical but could be a useful resource.

"Becoming a person of the plants is not a learning process, it is a remembering process. Somewhere in our ancestral line, there was someone that lived deeply connected to the Earth, the Elements, the Sun, Moon and Stars. That ancestor lives inside our DNA, dormant, unexpressed, waiting to be remembered and brought back to life to show us the true nature of our indigenous soul" - Sajah Popham.
 
jamie
#56 Posted : 4/17/2012 1:47:43 AM

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AlbertKLloyd wrote:
I've heard reports of activity of very low doses of harmala alkaloids.
They can be curiously active in this way.

Ott for example reports that harmaline potentiated Bufotenine at a dose of 0.11 mg/kg.


Just want to add that, unless I am mistaken ott was using snuffed harmalas..harmalas IME are very active when snuffed..more active than even sublingual..I did some experiments a few months back and when harmalas are snuffed they are far more active than when ingested orally.

edit..nm i realize I already mentioned that earlier on...

However I would like to add also to the earlier discussion about flavanoids, that I do experience activity and some potentiation from plant flavanoids..Eating a raw vegan diet you tend to end up trying out alot of different plants in your diet..and after researching flavanoids based on my readings on the diets of early primates that seemed to be high in them I started to seek them out. I have experience some weird potentiation a number of of times with vaped DMT and ayahuasca when adding alot of flavanoid rich foods into my diet.
Long live the unwoke.
 
nen888
#57 Posted : 4/19/2012 10:08:50 AM
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..thanks for that cool observation jamie..
& thanks xantho for the link..

Toadfreak1 wrote:
Quote:
So I picked up a Passiflora biflora today. Will a photo when the buds go into bloom, looking for some info on the little gal now.
..the beautiful P. biflora is a native of Florida, USA..it is a host plant for the larvae of the butterfly Heliconius charithonia (the official butterfly for the state of Florida, 'Zebra Longwing' )..as this, and another dozen or so Heliconnius buuterflies have been found to contain Harmala alkaloids, it is assumed that the plant contains these alkaloids..
from Adaptation to ingestion of β-carboline alkaloids by Heliconiini butterflies by Janice Clymer Cavin, Timothy J. Bradley 1988:
Quote:
Butterflies of the tribe Heliconiini (Nymphalidae) are specialist herbivores in which the larvae utilize the plant family Passifloraceae. Their adaptation to their host plant's toxins was examined by analyzing retention and excretion of three Passiflora alkaloids: norharman, harman and harmine. Three species of adult Heliconiines were analyzed for the presence of these β-carboline alkaloids. The butterflies were found to sequester a substantial proportion of the alkaloids ingested by the larvae.
nen888 attached the following image(s):
p. biflora.jpg (277kb) downloaded 276 time(s).
zebra-longwing-heliconius-charithonia-vazquezae-ventral.jpg (195kb) downloaded 275 time(s).
charithonius larva.jpg (92kb) downloaded 276 time(s).
 
Dan
#58 Posted : 4/19/2012 10:13:31 PM

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Awesome nen. Big grin

I live in Florida and that biflora has me curious now, might have to get one for my garden. I love those butterflies too. Do the larvae hurt the biflora at all?

I should be able to find one locally since im in florida so im gonna start looking.

Keep the passifloras coming nen. Razz
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nen888
#59 Posted : 4/21/2012 8:32:41 AM
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..thanks DanSmile..and that is the actual larvae of the Zebra Longwing on a P.biflora in the last pic..
as far as i know, such highly specialist feeders (they only graze this spceies and P. suberosa) tend to require symbiosis, so while munching through a few leaves they don't otherwise hurt the plant..
.
 
nen888
#60 Posted : 4/22/2012 6:39:50 AM
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..hey jamie, you wrote:
Quote:
I have experience some weird potentiation a number of of times with vaped DMT and ayahuasca when adding alot of flavanoid rich foods into my diet.
..i'm curious as to what kinds of flavonoid rich foods had this effect..berries? certain fruits? this could explain a lot of previously unexplained potentiations of some entheogens..
..i'm now finding the list i hastily compiled on p1 here of MAOI Plant Flavonoids, quite handy when looking through phytochemical survey lists..i'm sure this list is by no means complete yet..
.
 
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