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Trying to improve Acacia information Options
 
nen888
#301 Posted : 2/11/2012 4:51:16 AM
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..yeah i think your ID skills are good Muttley..[edit: see acacia ID thread here]will look closer, but seems to be Paraserianthes lophantha..once an Albizzia, no chemical studies i'm aware of..

NB..i have made some corrections and additions to the BOTANICAL TERMS post above and have clarified what was going on in the A. confusa botanical drawing above #300.
........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................


..on the outer frontiers of Acacia alkaloid knowledge, Roveli in 1967 found a completely new kind of Spermidine alkaloid in Acacia myrtifolia (Western Australian native)
.here is a paper summarizing the chemistry of spermindine and spermine bases found in plants and animals..MACROCYCLIC SPERMID1NE AND SPERMINE ALKALOIDS BawIa, M. M. et al.
Quote:
The first example of this new alkaloid group was the spermidine alkaloid lunarine (7), isolated by E. I-lairs in the year 1908 from Lunaria biennis
Moench (Cruciferaceae)
..see pic below..i do not know a lot about the toxicity of spermidine compounds and am currently researching, but caution would be advised as some spermidine alkaloids can be manipulated into tropane-like compounds..
..the alkaloid in A. myrtifolia was tentatively named acacine, but i can't find the structure..all quite mysterious..i do not know of any other findings of this kind of alkaloid in acacias..

below are the structure of the spermidine alkaloid Lunarine,
and below that Acacia myrtifolia..[edit: see p.47]
nen888 attached the following image(s):
Lunarine structure.jpg (25kb) downloaded 679 time(s).
A. myrtifolia photos.jpg (189kb) downloaded 678 time(s).
 

Good quality Syrian rue (Peganum harmala) for an incredible price!
 
nen888
#302 Posted : 2/11/2012 4:58:40 AM
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..oh, and belated thanks to a1pha for being the first ever respondent to this thread or any of my nexus posts..Smile
 
jamie
#303 Posted : 2/11/2012 6:43:17 AM

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this is so needed and the best thread going right now I think.
 
nen888
#304 Posted : 2/11/2012 6:51:10 AM
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..i'm humbled and blush..respect and thanks jamie..it was reading many of your Fractal Enhancement posts, as well as those of endlessness, Entropymancer, benzyme, Infindibildum, burnt, and others, that i really felt that the nexus was the place to become involved with for tryptamine information..i saw that the nexus was really needed..
thanks for your bufotenine and harmala work especially..Very happy
.
 
nen888
#305 Posted : 2/12/2012 4:07:40 AM
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..i almost forgot!..the spermidine alkaloid found in A. myrtifolia was named Acacine (see few posts back)
wira, you wrote in the provincialis thread:
Quote:
Just to clarify, the alkaloid identified in Acacia myrtifolia was acacine, a spermidine alkaloid...
..as i know you have the paper, does it have the structure, or the formula to construct one..?
 
nen888
#306 Posted : 2/12/2012 4:22:42 AM
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..here is some stuff i found in the Society For Growing Australian Plants: Acacia Study Group Newsletter No. 112 March 2011 (they are the experts on the ecology and botany of australian acacias)
it was in response to the threatened australian government legislation to ban tryptamine acacias, which also partly inspired the creation of this thread..
Quote:
Proposed Government Ban on Acacias
The Commonwealth Government is proposing legislation
that will expand the current list of prohibited plants that can
be used for drug purposes, and has released a discussion
paper on this. It is proposed that the list of prohibited plants
will include any plant that contains DMT
(dimethyltryptamine). A number of Acacia species contain
DMT - I have seen a list of about 20 species, but I am also
advised that many species have never been analysed and it
is very likely that the list of species with DMT would be
significantly more than 20.
Under the Government's proposal, any commercial
propagation or sale of species containing DMT would
constitute a criminal offence.
I know that many Study Group members are already aware
of this issue, and that some have very strong views – words
like “sheer insanity”, “proposed Legislation is very poorly
researched”, “unwieldy”, “strongly opposed to legislation”,
have been used by members in emails that I have received.
The Government’s Discussion Paper is available on the web
site of the Attorney-General’s Department
(www.ag.gov.au). It invited submissions from the public,
and I lodged a submission on behalf of the Acacia Study
Group (this is included on pages 9 and 10 of this
Newsletter). The closing date for submissions was 11
March 2011, so it is now too late to lodge further
submissions. However, I assume that if you have strong
views regarding the Government proposal, it may be
worthwhile contacting your local member or writing
directly to the Attorney-General.

Quote:
Presence of DMT in Acacia species
The genus Acacia is the largest group of vascular plants in Australia, with over 1,000 species currently recognized (comprising
about 1,350 taxa once subspecies and varieties are included).
The presence of DMT in Acacia species was first recognized in 1965 when the bark of Acacia maidenii was found to contain
DMT. Two years later, in 1967, the leaves of Acacia phlebophylla were found to yield about 0.3% of DMT.
In 1990, CSIRO published the results of some joint work of the CSIRO Division of Organic Chemistry (later Division of
Applied Organic Chemistry) and the Australian universities investigating Australian (and PNG) plants for new medicinal drugs.
In this book, 16 Acacia species are listed as containing appreciable alkaloid content up to 1.3%. The alkaloids present were not
identified because testing did not reveal medicinal value. Those species were A. aneura, A. angusta, A. argentea (now A.
leptostachya), A. complanata, A. drummondii, A. harpophylla, A. holosericea, A. kettlewelliae, A. leptocarpa, A. longissima, A.
maidenii, A. neriifolia, A. obtusifolia, A. oxycedrus, A. podalyriifolia and A. polystachya. Alkaloid was found in leaf and, in
some, bark. In all, 125 Acacia species were tested qualitatively, some being positive for alkaloid, others negative.
In more recent years, DMT has been reported as occurring in a number of commonly cultivated Acacia species, including the
following: A. baileyana (Cootamundra Wattle), A. colei, A. complanata, A. longifolia, A. melanoxylon (Blackwood), A. podalyriifolia,
A. provincialis (formerly A. retinodes) and A. victoriae. Note that DMT has also been reported in a number of
non-Australian species of Acacia, but we have not referred to them in this submission.
We are aware of one report that “unpublished research has already established the presence of DMT in over 150 wattle species”.
We are unable to comment as to the validity of this statement.
We have, however, been advised by Dr C C J Culvenor (formerly Chief Research Scientist, CSIRO Division of Organic
Chemistry) that, in his understanding, very few Australian species of Acacia would have been analysed for the presence of DMT,
but if analyses were carried out, he would expect many additional species would test positive for DMT.
We believe that there is strong evidence that DMT is found in many species of Acacia, and if the proposals in the Government
Discussion Paper are adopted in legislation, then these species will all be classified as Controlled Plants. We believe that it would
be totally unworkable and inappropriate for legislation to proceed in the form proposed in the Discussion Paper, for the reasons
set out below.
Reasons for Objecting to Proposals
(a) Acacias are very commonly and popularly grown as garden plants in Australia, in both public and private gardens. The
effect of the Government proposal will be to restrict the ability of people to grow these favoured plants in their own
gardens.
(b) As well as popular garden plants, Acacias are extremely common in native vegetation and are frequently planted or
occur naturally on roadsides and are used in native revegetation programs. Acacias also serve an important ecological
function in natural and planted vegetation as nitrogen fixing legumes that increase soil fertility (hence they are common
in primary vegetation regrowth in disturbed ecosystems).Acacia Study Group Newsletter No. 112 Page 10
(c) Some of the Acacia species that will be impacted by the proposal are rare species. For example A. phlebophylla is a rare
species known only from a limited area near Mt Buffalo in Victoria (and is listed under the Victorian Flora and Fauna
Guarantee Act). The ongoing cultivation of this, and other similar rare species, is important as a means of assisting the
future survival of these species. The Government proposals therefore threaten these conservation efforts, and impact
detrimentally on the nation’s biodiversity. It is also noted that if the cultivation of these plants is prohibited, then the
remaining wild populations may well be placed under additional threat from individuals who may be seeking material
for the manufacture of drugs.
(d) The proposals are unwieldy and too generalized. There is little hope that people will know which species contain DMT
– and a consequence of this is that people will unknowingly be committing criminal offences. Whilst we are aware that
Government spokespeople have denied that backyard plants will be banned or their growers prosecuted, we believe that
it is unacceptable to ask people to rely on this reassurance – if in fact they are effectively committing a criminal offence.
The proposals are also unwieldy in that a number of species would be virtually impossible for non-experts to distinguish,
especially when not in pod or flower.
(e) We believe that the proposals are also unlikely to achieve what the Government may be hoping to achieve. Some of the
species that are reported as containing DMT are very common, and in some cases have become weed species in parts of
Australia. For example, this would apply to Acacia baileyana and A. longifolia. It would be a simple matter for a
person to obtain plant material from these weed infested areas – and hence the banning of garden plants would seem to
be futile. We believe this proposal will draw unnecessary attention to the presence of DMT in many common plants and
could in fact promote the spread of such information and increase the likelihood of inappropriate human use of such
alkaloids.
(f) It is noted that some of the species reported as containing DMT are also very significant species for a variety of reasons.
Acacia seed as a source of human food has been a subject of increasing interest and research in recent years. Acacia
victoriae is the most important species in the Australian bush food industry, whilst Acacia colei is showing promise as a
source of human food in semi arid regions of the Sahel, West Africa. Acacia victoriae is also important as chemicals
extracted from this plant have been shown to have anti-cancer properties, and current research may lead to these anticancer agents
being used in future for the treatment of human skin cancer and other malignancies of the gut and glands.
Rather than banning these plants in Australia, we should appreciate and value their unique qualities, and take action to
protect and promote them.
(g) The wattle is Australia’s national flower, and is proudly celebrated as part of our cultural heritage by Australians on
Wattle Day and on other festive and sporting occasions. It also features on our coat of arms. The absurdity of the
Government proposals, even in banning some species, is very evident when considered in the context of this national
heritage.

In conclusion, many Australians grow Acacia species for many reasons, and the costs of these proposals will far outweigh the
perceived benefits. The Government proposals will limit the ability of Australians to continue to enjoy nature as they have in the
past, and in some cases will render them subject to criminal proceedings. We believe that this is a totally unacceptable outcome.

..this was all about 3 months before this thread launched..the work continues..
thank you all contributors so far, look forward to what 2012 brings in..

& thanks above all to the trees, for unveiling, teaching and healing..
............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................


ps. for botanical interest, in that issue of the Acacia Study Group newsletter was a list of some Mistletoes symbiotic with australian acacias..

Amyema fitzgeraldii – an exclusive parasite of Acacia
species, common on A. acuminata
Amyema hilliana - recorded from six species of Acacia,
especially A. estrophiolata and A. victoriae
Amyema maidenii - primarily associated with Acacia,
especially A. aneura and A. harpophylla
Amyema nestor - recorded from 7 species of Acacia, locally
common on A. grasbyi
Amyema preissii - dependent primarily on Acacia Species
Korthalsella leucothrix - known from only 4 species of
Acacia (the suggested common name for this plant is the
Acacia Jointed Mistletoe)
Lysiana murrayi - closely associated with Acacia species,
especially A. aneura

.. "Mistletoes of Southern Australia" By David M Watson Published by CSIRO 2011
"Although this is a book about Mistletoes, Acacias are frequently mentioned in the book as they are common hosts of mistletoes. In Australia there are 91 species of Mistletoe, and this book includes descriptions of the 46 species found in southern Australia..."
..we would expect the chemistry of acacia associated mistletoes in particular to be very interesting...

lastly for those in drier parts of Australia and many parts of Africa, below is Acacia colei, reported 1% DMT in bark..needs followup research..
nen888 attached the following image(s):
Acacia colei_.jpg (200kb) downloaded 654 time(s).
Acacia colei var. colei.jpg (240kb) downloaded 653 time(s).
 
wira
#307 Posted : 2/12/2012 2:52:50 PM

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Hi nen888, you're certainly keeping busy othis thread!
Just a reminder, Hegnauer DID NOT report that claimed high yield (or any yield) of DMT from podalyriaefolia. I have gone through that literature many times and this is definitely a false reference. Btw Hegnauer's Chemotaxonomie der Pflanzen volumes did not report on his own findings but were simply compendiums summarizing and referencing phytochemical studies across different plant families.
Regarding A. myrtifolia and acacine, Rovelli isolated the alkaloid but could not determine its structure. It was John K. Nichols who reported its identification in his 1983 thesis. Even then, he wasn't certain of the structure beyond it being a spermidine alkaloid, and he proposed three possible structures. I'll get some images of those to you soon...
 
nen888
#308 Posted : 2/13/2012 5:31:13 AM
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..thanks wira..keeping busy so i can give my eyes a rest from the screen and look at some nature,Smile
i wonder what the origin of 1.8% DMT in A. podalyriifolia is? at least we know (from the CSIRO and White) that it contains tryptamine/alkaloids..and Iain1's recent experiment certainly yielded something..

i am looking forward to seeing the proposed Acacine structures..why? because of what the breakdown components under acid, base or heat may be..

..it seems fairly certain that there is some very interesting unpublished acacia research out there indicating a lot more tryptamines than publically known..
 
Gowpen
#309 Posted : 2/13/2012 8:08:34 AM

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nen888 wrote:
..thanks wira..keeping busy so i can give my eyes a rest from the screen and look at some nature,Smile
i wonder what the origin of 1.8% DMT in A. podalyriifolia is? at least we know (from the CSIRO and White) that it contains tryptamine/alkaloids..and Ia1n's recent experiment certainly yielded something..

i am looking forward to seeing the proposed Acacine structures..why? because of what the breakdown components under acid, base or heat may be..

..it seems fairly certain that there is some very interesting unpublished acacia research out there indicating a lot more tryptamines than publically known..


a short update from me is that the yellow wax/oil I obtained from the podalyriifolia dissolved in and out of the shellite when frozen. (this fluid/solvent may of course be a factor but low probability.) the 5 -10-10 20 bioassay spread over 2 hours had nothing but a calming effect, however,I have associated this with sitting eyes closed for a few mins hoping the DMT was there......It was not

Not to be betten...... I did a quick extraction of 50gms bark with an A/B using the vinegar as before, with a dash of methelated spirits. then reduced the liquid added base (perhaps a bit more (100gms to pint )) I let cool to room temp this time, added 100ml shelite x 3 (on the last one I added 20ml of base solution ) ... NO DMT or yellow gunk as was in the leaves.... nice clear solvent

A test might confirm the extraction from the leaves is perhaps trytamines, but non-psychoactive ones, or just oil...... Phew I'm free from

A. podalyriifolia
One can never cross the ocean without the Courage to lose sight of the shore
 
nen888
#310 Posted : 2/14/2012 12:41:15 AM
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..thanks Iain1, sounds like maybe simple tryptamine..thanks for the experiment..i will have a go at podalyriifolia in a couple of months for more one look, but certainly i have had the species listed in the Australian list for a while [p5] as "tryptamine, phenethylamine..1 report DMT..numerous negative results on net.."
i will remove the 1 report DMT as wira has found this to be a false reference..
..how's acuminmata going..Smile?
 
Gowpen
#311 Posted : 2/14/2012 6:05:24 AM

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Have not Id'ed acuminata as yet... its here and I have some spy's out there looking to........ might have to wait till flowering time...
Regards
Iain
One can never cross the ocean without the Courage to lose sight of the shore
 
nen888
#312 Posted : 2/15/2012 5:01:29 AM
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..ok, i've made a few changes to the Australian tryptamine & psychoactive Acacias list here..to keep it as accurate as possible as of now..

firstly, Acacia podalyriifolia has been RELEGATED to the "In Research Due To Strong Evidence" sub-list..this is because the single multi-cited reference to a high % of DMT turns out not to actually be in the cited work (Chemotoxie der planzfen by Robert Hegnauer which is itself reliable) - so, though the evidence is not 'strong' it is still, however, 'under research', in part because sufficiently large amounts of simple tryptamine may be psychoactive, however this is still not actually as 'strong' a claim as other species in that sub-list..[i'm also curious as to how 1.8% DMT suddenly appears in a few sources..the parroted reference is false, but would someone just make this up? could there be a claim somewhere?]
let me explain what the methodology was/is..the 38 confirmed species were confirmed by either reliable published data, reliable or known unpublished data, or reliably reported bio-assay of extract or plant..
..the "Under Research.." sub-list below is compiled from cases where single cases of tryptamines have either been first-hand reported to me, or witnessed in research, but either need verification by this author, species confirmation, or further research to establish the kind of alkaloids..

..the relegation to 2nd division of podralyriifolia has temporarily reduced the confirmed list of aussie acacias to 37, however, i can confirm from personal observation and incoming information that another one or two will be added very soon..
and as i have mentioned earlier, there are a few extremely rare and endangered confirmed species i have left off the list entirely, for their protection..
& a few more species (about 10) confirmed by australian researcher 'J.J.', but yet to be made public..

lastly, to make the list clearer in another aspect, i will add an (*) to each species that has actually been safely bio-assayed by humans..

having re-checked, i am confident of the information regarding the current 37 listings..
.

NB. A. melanoxylon has only (as far as i've seen) very small amounts of DMT..a few species have different chemical sub-strains, seasonal, or occasionally, individual variability..
 
Spice Sailor
#313 Posted : 2/16/2012 11:07:13 PM

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[quote=Muttley]These pictures were taken all at the same time, and they are from the same plant. I think it is an an acacia longifolia. What do you think?

Hey Muttley know the post is a little old but was scoping out your recent acacia images and just wanted to confirm with you that they are all of one tree/ plant or of a few in close proximity? I agree with you about the longifolia attributes, to an extent, and also with bricklayer regarding the first few images looking like floribundas. That being said depending where you are located I think what you have is some hybridisation between floribunda, (image with 3 - 5 flower spikes per phyllode node a trait of floribun), obtusifolia or a hybrid of obtusifolia ( because a number of the images show Phyllodes with red glandular margins and slight irregularities in phyllode margins. ) and longifolia due to what nen said about the golden yellow of the flowers. So I feel they should have good genetics for what we desire. In regards to your extract not going so well i wouldnt be disheartened. My latest extract from a pretty consistent %0.3 - %0.4 maidenii in early jan yielded very poorly ( 200mg spice from 500 g dry bark shredded/ powdered bark. ) usually get 1.5 - 2.0 g from same amount. I put it down to lots of rain and the tree beginning to bud heavily with flower spikes.

Hope that helps, I find having a description from World wide wattle or better your local flora identification literature to compair against your plant material in the field is very useful. Keep searching and learning.

Spice sailor
 
nen888
#314 Posted : 2/17/2012 5:00:34 AM
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..thanks for the info., and welcome Spice Sailor..Smile
i've similarly known usually high yielding populations to occasionally be almost devoid, depending on season or individual specimen..
based on what is known about acacia polyploid genetics, there may be 8 'kinds' of some particular species, as well has hybrids..
i also think available soil nitrogen makes a big difference in alkaloid content..
.
the first photo below is a variety of A. longifolia which has some common genes with obtusifolia..they would have had a common ancestor in the misty past..
this variety is 'active', particularly at certain times of year..
.
& below that, for no particular reason other than middle-eastern research, are, growing in Israel, Acacia albida (Ana Tree), Acacia saligna (australian) and A. tortillis subsp. raddiana (endemic to Israel/Sinai)..
nen888 attached the following image(s):
Acacia longifolia - type 'obtusifolia'.jpg (205kb) downloaded 709 time(s).
Ana tree - White Acacia - Israel.jpg (112kb) downloaded 702 time(s).
acacia saligna - israel.jpg (73kb) downloaded 701 time(s).
Acacia raddiana.jpg (169kb) downloaded 699 time(s).
A. raddiana flowers.jpg (83kb) downloaded 692 time(s).
 
Spice Sailor
#315 Posted : 2/17/2012 10:39:02 PM

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Nen88 your knowledge, wisdom and environmental consciousness is inspiring. Do you know if the acacias we are referring to could be defined as A)"sub-species" or "variations" eg. A. Longifolia sophorae? B) By different species with assumed genetic heritage (longifolia group) and notable physical or distributional differences ie A. longisimma? Or C) following the less obvious, harder to define changes in A. concurrens (and its very close relatives / subspecies/ variations that I won't mention here.)

Be great to hear yours and other nexians theories. I have been doing some amateur documentation of A. Concurrens and it's close family around my area (SE Queens) and am keen to compare / discuss findings and theories.

Also on a random topic should I be able to post in this area with my seedling picture still under my avatar ? Don't want to rock the spice ship.

Cheers - spice sailor
 
nen888
#316 Posted : 2/18/2012 2:40:05 AM
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..hi again Spice Sailor, with the 'seedling' near your avatar you can post in any Welcome Area topics..as you seem to have some good information/knowledge, i'm sure it won't be too long before you get full access..

regarding my polyploid comment, i was referring to morphological variants rather than defined 'sub-species', but the issue of speciation is not agreed upon within botany..hence the two often referred to botanist camps - the 'lumpers' vs. the 'splitters', the latter group inclined to define various subspecies, and the former lump them together..a polyploid plant can have 8 or more sets of chromosomes, so i would call each expression a different 'type' within a species or sub-species..the differences may be very subtle, e.g. just alkaloid content or slightly different phyllode shape..in my view, if a specimen with specific features breeds true to seed without signs of genetic 'throwback', it is a species if not a sub-species..i still think A. sophorae should be it's own species, as it once was..

..the Acacia concurrens 'complex' constitutes "a group of closely interrelated and taxonomically 'difficult' species belonging to the often confused and poorly defined ' A. cunninghamii group', see L.Pedley, Contrib. Queensland Herb . 15: 9 (1974), Austrobaileya 1: 179 (1978 ) and Austrobaileya 5: 320 (1999)." [WWW] ..these species include
A. crassa , A. leiocalyx and A. longispicata . "Many other species with spicate inflorescences and large phyllodes with anastomosing secondary veins (and the major longitudinal veins either running together or confluent with the lower margin near the base) have been referred to this group, including A. cretata and A. tropica . See also A. tingoorensis ." ..some botanists (particularly those in NSW) may prefer to lump some of these together as one 'species'..others would argue that speciation is evolutionarily occuring..certainly i have seen a good yield tryptamines from a plant within this complex (near your area), but exactly which one i'm still working out, as well as how many in this complex are similar..
would love to hear of your findings..
nen888 attached the following image(s):
a. concurrens.jpg (77kb) downloaded 667 time(s).
 
nen888
#317 Posted : 2/21/2012 8:10:10 AM
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..hi radmotion
i highly recommend studying the photos and information in this thread regarding acacia i.d.
.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

..a little more on the A. concurrens complex mentioned earlier..the identity of the tryptamine positive member of this group seems to be Acacia leiocalyx subsp. leiocalyx (central to SE QLD, and northern NSW) ..it has been previously found alkaloid +ve by the CSIRO..i have a feeling 'J' may have looked at this one, will check..
% was 0.3-0.4% from stem bark
it is pictured below along with three associated caterpillars (butterflies - the middle one is a mystery to entomologists)
..so, plenty of possible research for queenslanders..
nen888 attached the following image(s):
leiocalyx_subsp_leiocalyx.jpg (79kb) downloaded 629 time(s).
A. leiocalyx pods.jpg (51kb) downloaded 629 time(s).
acacia-leiocalyx flowers.jpg (87kb) downloaded 629 time(s).
daemeli.jpg (10kb) downloaded 626 time(s).
queryf.jpg (5kb) downloaded 625 time(s).
bryoph.jpg (6kb) downloaded 620 time(s).
 
nen888
#318 Posted : 2/21/2012 8:16:41 AM
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Acacia expert | Skills: Acacia, Botany, Tryptamines, CounsellingExtraordinary knowledge | Skills: Acacia, Botany, Tryptamines, CounsellingSenior Member | Skills: Acacia, Botany, Tryptamines, Counselling

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..dmt is everywhere, but..the more time you spend getting to know trees, the more rewarding the experience will be...
 
nen888
#319 Posted : 2/23/2012 7:00:37 AM
member for the trees

Acacia expert | Skills: Acacia, Botany, Tryptamines, CounsellingExtraordinary knowledge | Skills: Acacia, Botany, Tryptamines, CounsellingSenior Member | Skills: Acacia, Botany, Tryptamines, Counselling

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..a Central and south American tree really in need of more research is Acacia caven (Molina)
it is widely grown in horticulture in California and Central America..seeds and live plants are sold by nurseries..

..it is reported (without reference) to contain tryptamines and according to Rastch "Leaves of this and other plants, including tobacco, are occasionally smoked with Anadenanthera seeds."

..it's flowering time is usually Late Winter/Early Spring, seed pods developing around Mid Spring..
nen888 attached the following image(s):
A. caven flowers .jpg (275kb) downloaded 597 time(s).
Acacia caven in California.jpg (274kb) downloaded 600 time(s).
A. caven green pods.jpg (73kb) downloaded 591 time(s).
A. caven ripe pod & flower.jpg (17kb) downloaded 592 time(s).
 
radmotion
#320 Posted : 2/23/2012 9:34:52 AM

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Hey nen888 thanks for the reply, i will get a clearer photo of the leafs as soon as i can, Also id like to ask, what is the % of dmt in Acacia cyclops?
Thanks.
 
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