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Trying to improve Acacia information Options
 
nen888
#81 Posted : 8/26/2011 4:27:48 AM
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..hi humblebee, you're on the right track, stem bark is friendlier to the trees..

there's a few californian acacias i don't believe have been studied chemically...
 

STS is a community for people interested in growing, preserving and researching botanical species, particularly those with remarkable therapeutic and/or psychoactive properties.
 
nen888
#82 Posted : 8/26/2011 4:32:45 AM
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..so here's the ASIAN TRYPTAMINE ACACIAS (incl. India & the Himalayas) list: (..i sense ancient secrets yet to be uncovered here..)

..Acacias in the east have long and ancient traditions that still need to be documented/researched thouroughly..

Quote:
..Several parts (mainly bark, root and resin) of Acacia are used to make incense for rituals. Acacia is used in incense mainly in India, Nepal, and China including in its Tibet region. Smoke from Acacia bark is thought to keep demons and ghosts away and to put the gods in a good mood. Roots and resin from Acacia are combined with rhododendron, acorus, cytisus, salvia and some other components of incense.
[wikipedia]

..A. farnensiana (introduced somehow a long time ago from Central America), is used in ayurvedic healing to treat premature ejaculation..A. nilotica subsp. indica & other acacias are used in ayurveda to treat a wide range of illnesses incl. rhumetism, digestive problems & skin diseases..

..also, to quote/paraphrase BlueLunarNight in "Khadiravani Tara" [dmt-nexus.me>Mystic/Esoteric]..
Quote:
Khadiravani Tara means 'Tara of the Acacia Grove/Forest'... (also some sources suspiciously mistranslate it as 'Tara of the Teak Grove')
[from Judika Illes' Encyclopedia of Spirits, p. 565]
Quote:
"Khadira literally means acacia, among the most popular of Himalayan shamanic plants ... Khadiravani may be an indigenous Bon Po spirit eventually identified with Tara..."
[from Robert Beer's Encylopedia of Tibetan Symbols & Motifs, p. 50:]
"Buddhist deities such as ... Khadiravani Tara are associated with specific trees ... [She] is described with khadira trees (acacia catechu) surrounding her..."

(thanks(ta) BlueLunarNightSmile

Acacia caesia China, Tawian, Phillipines, India, SE Asia - DMT-N-Oxide & Tryptamine [Ghosal 1972].
Acacia catechu ('Khadira') Asia,China (incl.Tibet), India & Indian Ocean  - DMT and other tryptamines in leaf, bark[ref Sacred Elixirs; M. Crowley].
Acacia catechuoides (closely related) India (Sikkim, Assam, West Bengal) used in ayurveda.
Acacia chundra Asia, India & Indian Ocean - DMT and other tryptamines in leaf, bark [Ref Pharmamceutical Excipients].
Acacia confusa ('The Thoughtful Tree') S.E.Asia incl. Phillipines,Taiwan,China - 0.8-2.85% DMT & NMT in bark, 0.2% leaf (?)
also N,N-dimethyltryptamineN-oxide [Ref: Lui et al. 1977; Buchannan et al. 2007].
there are various net reports suggesting variable levels of NMT, but usually consistently finding DMT. This tree is traditionally associated with Confucius & Taoism, and in S.E. Asia there are modern spiritual groups who work with it..
Acacia nilotica subsp. indica ('Babul') Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, Nepal and Pakistan is used in ayurvedic medicine.. A. nilotica in africa was said to contain harmalas and tryptamine [Oliver-Bever].
Acacia yunnanensis - native to China, suspected by Trout 2004 of containing tryptamines..known as the 'Yunnan Thoughtful Tree'.

Acacia polyacantha (native Africa, DMT in leaf) is naturalized in Sth.Asia
and Acacia mangium (native QLD, Aus., 1 report of DMT, 1 negative) is planted extensively for timber in Malaysia..

..a couple of Chinese Mimosa's are traditionally also known as 'Thoughtful Trees' and are associated with old taoist traditions..i have not had a chance to research acacia in chinese medicine yet..

..Albizzia julibrissin (once placed in Mimosa) is native to southwestern and eastern Asia, from Persia east to China and Korea. It is also widely known as Persian silk tree. Albizzia julibrissin has been found to possess antidepressant properties, most likely mediated through 5-HT1A receptors.[Ref: PMID 17477962] it contains serotonin & noripinephrine (Applewhite 1973)

..as usual this list probably isn't complete yet..[EDIT: see p24#470 for more S.E. Asian species..]

here's some photos... (A. catechu 1 & 2, A. chundra, A. confusa 1,2,3, A. nilotica subsp. indica)
nen888 attached the following image(s):
Acacia catechu 1.jpg (48kb) downloaded 1,566 time(s).
Acacia-catechu2.jpg (167kb) downloaded 1,572 time(s).
Acaciachundra.jpg (139kb) downloaded 1,571 time(s).
Acacia_confusa-01.jpg (49kb) downloaded 1,572 time(s).
acacia-confusa-tree.jpg (51kb) downloaded 1,564 time(s).
_Acacia_confusa2.jpg (1,622kb) downloaded 1,558 time(s).
Acacia-nilotica-ssp-indica-Vikas-puri.jpg (26kb) downloaded 1,525 time(s).
 
nen888
#83 Posted : 8/27/2011 1:19:42 AM
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..ps humblebee, it's hard to predict if dead tree bark is still active, depends on whether there's been heavy rain or not..
if your species is the active A. maidenii it may have up to 0.6% alkaloid in the leaves (tests by 'M' 2000)...
 
humblebee
#84 Posted : 8/28/2011 9:45:35 PM

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Thanks nen888,
The weather here is lots of rain late oct thru april- may the rest of the year is completely dry. I could take some of the old trunk and try. But it looks like quite an undertaking, may be a lot of work for nothing. Can one use the stb tek normally used for mhrb on A. Maidenii?
Upon return from hyperspace-"Wow I have a body with arms and legs and everything!"

btw-It's all true!
 
nen888
#85 Posted : 8/29/2011 4:16:26 AM
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..STB usually works humblebee, though acidification can help make things more soluble, hence easier to work with..

ps.this (link below) is the checklist of Bolivian Fabaceae plants i'm beginning my search for yatiqiri's latest tree (p.4 this thread), which i'm fairly certain is not mimosa or acacia (though closer to acacia)..anyone wanna help out i won't complain...Smile
Bolivia Fabaceae checklist

..good luck all researchers of the light! (love PrimalWisdom's term)...
 
nen888
#86 Posted : 8/31/2011 2:45:18 AM
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Another North American Tryptamine Acacia,
with a surprising range of alkaloids, is

Acacia berlandieri (‘Guajillo’) (Southwestern United States incl. Texas and northeast Mexico).
DMT, amphetamines, mescaline, nicotine
[ref. Clement, Beverly A.; Christina M. Goff and T. David A. Forbes (September 1997). "Toxic amines and alkaloids from Acacia berlandieri". Phytochemistry (Elsevier) 46 (2): 249–254] this finding has been questioned (not sure why) & there are older findings of tyramine derivatives (see later in thread)
(caution should be exercised orally ingesting this or any other nicotine containing plant, even if the reported levels are small)
i don't know if anyone has ever bio-assayed this plant, it is described as toxic to cattle, but they would graze huge amounts...
nen888 attached the following image(s):
Acacia_berlandieri.jpg (9kb) downloaded 1,437 time(s).
A. berlandieri2.jpg (127kb) downloaded 1,437 time(s).
Guajillo leaves.jpg (54kb) downloaded 1,420 time(s).
 
sinful_speed
#87 Posted : 8/31/2011 1:48:34 PM

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Thanks nen888. I was strolling around looking for identifiable seeds/pods but since we are in the mddle of the city, any fallen plant material has been swept away by rain and street sweepers. I found small twisted pods that were still hanging on one of the trees, it was too high for me to reach, I couldn't get any samples.
 
nen888
#88 Posted : 9/1/2011 4:38:17 AM
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..more info. about some of the more recently discovered Australian tryptamine acacias..

A. alpina (Victoria) was recorded to naturally hybridize with the rarer A. phlebophylla (0.3%mainly DMT, some NMT, trace betacarboline) ..around 10 years ago a fairly well known australian ethnobotanic researcher reported "active principles in the leaves".. in 2004 a sample of 30-40grams dry phyllodes was boiled in water, reduced, and consumed with 4grams P. harmala neat..entheogenic effects similar to a P. viridis tea taken the same way resulted..+2 level experience (two known bioassays)

A. dallachiana (Victoria,S.E. NSW) was also found to naturally hybridize with A. phlebophylla, and a recent bioassay reported to me confirmed it’s similar content..

A. binervata (not hugely abundant, but widespread (NSW,QLD) .. a small amount of extract from this plant was accidentally misplaced..& i haven't followed it up since.. it looked like OK yields (roughly 0.2-0.3% phyllodes)..in 2001 a friend 'M' subjected it to several reagents (Mayers, Dragendorf , tunguskic) using P. viridis as the standard, it was a near identical & strong spot..plants with multialkaloids usually show up slighly different colours.. ..i was put onto it by another friend ('R'Pleased who swore he could smell DMT in the fallen leaves..

A. saligna (South Aus.,WA,Vic.,NSW,) ..was my ID for the tree first bio-assayed by yatiqiri a few months ago, and found to have interesting tryptamine-like entheogenic effects, with possibly other kinds of alkaloids .. the ID has been revised to A. provincialis (Victoria), once thought to be a hybrid of saligna & retinodes..average alkaloid content was around 0.5%(?), and may have varied between parts of plant.. thanks hebrew,wira for help with ID..

& A. macradenia (Zig-Zag Wattle, QLD) ..there is a sole report of "tryptamines" on the Pharm.Excp. acacia blog, i will try to contact the author who is presumably the source..given recent developments with similar looking trees, it is well worth investigating.. here they are...

A.alpina, A.binervata 1,2, A.dallachiana, A.macradenia, A.saligna 1,2
nen888 attached the following image(s):
Acacia alpina.jpg (115kb) downloaded 1,389 time(s).
aca_binervata.jpg (22kb) downloaded 1,375 time(s).
A.binervata bot.gardens.jpg (12kb) downloaded 1,374 time(s).
Acacia dallachiana.jpg (157kb) downloaded 1,368 time(s).
acacia_macradenia.jpg (22kb) downloaded 1,356 time(s).
acacia-saligna.jpg (188kb) downloaded 1,360 time(s).
Acacia saligna branches.jpg (46kb) downloaded 1,344 time(s).
 
nen888
#89 Posted : 9/1/2011 4:55:27 AM
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..ps. sinful-speed, look forward to hearing more of your discoveries..
 
sinful_speed
#90 Posted : 9/2/2011 2:40:10 AM

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My family owns an island in the North called Monroe Island. My grandfather bought it in the 1940's. It has been neglected since 1991 and Acacia farnesiana has taken over most of the 60 Hectare piece of land.

Here's the link to the island, zoom in to see what I mean:

http://maps.google.com/m...m=1&ved=0CBwQ8gEwAA

 
nen888
#91 Posted : 9/2/2011 4:54:31 AM
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..wow, that tree gets around! thanks sinful-speed..Smile

wira reckons my ID of A. saligna is wrong, and it's A. retinodes var. retinodes,
..the study goes on...
 
yatiqiri
#92 Posted : 9/2/2011 6:30:56 AM

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nen888-''..as for the 0.02% alkaloid in retinodes, i have seen another test which found much higher levels, so a single test should never be seen as the final word..''

what are your thoughts on acacia melanoxylon?

''DMT, in the bark and leaf, but less than 0.02%'' - - -is this also from a single test??

if so, I may consider extracting from this tree,
...to clear myself of doubt and to contribute information (to the Nexus)
yatiqiri attached the following image(s):
acaciamelanoxylon.jpg (227kb) downloaded 1,313 time(s).
 
nen888
#93 Posted : 9/3/2011 1:51:32 AM
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..unfortunately, yatiqiri, a number of underground tests also found next to no DMT in
A. melanoxylon, although i have heard of a one off 'freak' finding of a good yeild..
so far the combined evidence points to the 0.02% finding, though i don't know if the variety known
as 'Blackwood' in Victoria (which is quite distinct) has been tested...

ps. still in friendly debate with wira re. a.saligna vs. a.retinodes...
 
hebrew
#94 Posted : 9/3/2011 10:07:04 AM
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wow some great discussion going on between these two acacia topics. saligna is an interesting one.

i am not so great at ID so i initially thought saligna but need to look at retinodes
 
nen888
#95 Posted : 9/4/2011 6:53:29 AM
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..thanks, hebrew, for getting me to more closely examine saligna, a beautiful tree...


..you know yatiqiri, your photo of melanoxylon is slightly different to the varieties which i know have been tested (perhaps 3 tests)..also some botanists have suggested melanoxylon should be split into at least 2 subspecies..
and there is 1 report of a good amount of dmt..

..it could be worth trying a quick extraction method on, say, 100g of twig or bark, to minimize time and get an idea...

ps. have you run into any local/native acacias your way..?
 
nen888
#96 Posted : 9/5/2011 3:08:43 AM
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..I've now agreed that the Yatiqiri bioassayed tree I described as A. Saligna is probablyA. Provincialis (Victoria native)..

will try and get official description soon, wira says is planted internationally, thanks wiraSmile
 
wira
#97 Posted : 9/5/2011 5:01:19 PM

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I'd lost this thread for a while, was looking in another sub-forum!
I have been going over the Wikipedia active Acacias list and providing a critique and offering some corrections, as a prelude to giving that page a well-needed revision and update. If the page has changed much in the last month or so, I may have missed it.
My Word version of this featured more extensive and selective underlining (to show acceptable listings), but I found when I pasted it here I had to re-do all the underlining manually, so in cases where the some but not all of an entry is accurate, I haven't always put in the selective underlining.

“Acacias Known to Contain Psychoactive Alkaloids”
Wikipedia version as of July 2011 – Critique and corrections by wira

Underlined entries are those accepted as more or less accurate. As far as validity of information, if someone one the internet claims they extracted DMT from a species, I will accept that though leave it open for verification or falsification by further studies. Properly referenced entries are preferred, in cases where the information has been published. [In that regard, this Wikipedia list is in terrible shape, as hardly any primary references are given.] If a species is simply included on a list with no supporting information, then it will be discounted. I haven’t corrected spelling mistakes in the ‘references’ section, but left them as is for now – they’re included here just so you can see what references are given. I will properly update the Wikipedia page in the near future, including primary references, most of which I have copies of. I haven’t added here the new reports or other species that are not so far listed on Wikipedia. I also haven't tackled the list of other species that have given positive tests for traces of unidentified alkaloids.
Note that the psychoactivity in humans of various simple phenethylamines is poorly known, but I have underlined entries for Acacias containing only such alkaloids, if they are from an accurate source (so that means the psychoactivity of, say, β-methyl-phenethylamine, in humans is still in question, so perhaps they shouldn’t be on the list, but the info is accurate).
Note that β-phenethylamine is the same as 2-phenylethylamine, and it’s generally the form people mean when they refer to just phenethylamine. N-methyl-phenethylamine is the same as β-methyl-phenethylamine.

Acacia acuminata
Up to 1.5% alkaloids, mainly consisting of dimethyltryptamine in bark, 0.6% leaves[1]

Acacia adunca
β-methyl-phenethylamine, 2.4% in leaves[2]
*As it is not actually known whether β-methyl-phenethylamine is psychoactive, this should probably not be on the list. Another study found 3.2% alkaloids in aerial parts (stems, phyllodes, flowers); about 70% was β-methyl-phenethylamine, with smaller amounts of phenethylamine (White 1957).

Acacia alpina
Dimethyltryptamine active levels in leaf[3]
*This still needs some confirmation and clarification, but otherwise is based on a definite report from bioassay. However, recent communications with the source reveal that the plant in question may have been a hybrid between alpina and phlebophylla, and could not be located for further investigation following fires at Mt Buffalo a few years back.

Acacia aneura
Ash used in Pituri.[4] Ether extracts about 2-6% of the dried leaf mass.[5] Not known if psychoactive per se.
*Accurate enough, but not found to contain psychoactive alkaloids as far as we know.

Acacia angustissima
β-methyl-phenethylamine,[6] NMT and DMT in leaf (1.1-10.2 ppm)[7]

Acacia aroma
Tryptamine alkaloids.[8] Significant amount of tryptamine in the seeds.[9]
*Can’t find any verification for this. Ref 9 is simply a list summarising known studies (and not doing a great job as far as accuracy, also giving no references), and there is no reason to think it represents new studies done by a Polish herbarium as has been suggested.

Acacia auriculiformis
5-MeO-DMT in stem bark[10]
*This is tentative. Should be ref’d to Trout & Friends.

Acacia baileyana
0.02% tryptamine and β-carbolines, in the leaf, Tetrahydroharman[3]

Acacia beauverdiana
Psychoactive,[11] ash used in Pituri.[4]
*The ash is used in pituri, but can find no verification for it being psychoactive.

Acacia berlandieri
DMT, amphetamines, mescaline, nicotine[12]
*The paper this stems from is highly suspect. Leaves HAVE been found to contain tyramine, N-methyl tyramine, N-methyl phenethylamine and hordenine (Adams & Camp 1966; Camp & Moore 1960).

Acacia catechu
DMT[13] and other tryptamines in leaf, bark
*As far as I can find, there is no literature reporting these alkaloids from this species. A Michael Crowley has reported the Vedic use of an ayahuasca-like beverage containing A. catechu (his ‘evidence’ is highly speculative), and claims it is a rich source of DMT (generally ref’d to Trout, falsely; can find no other source to support this). See http://earthrites.org/ma..._drugplants_crowley.htm

Acacia caven
Tryptamines
*Leaves of this and other plants, including tobacco, are occasionally smoked with Anadenanthera seeds, but I can find no trustworthy source for it containing tryptamines, and no reference is provided here.

Acacia chundra
DMT and other tryptamines in leaf, bark
*Can find no trustworthy source for this info. Perhaps an assumption, as it has been classified as a variety of A. catechu (A. catechu var. sundra). However, the references to DMT and other tryptamines in catechu aren’t good anyway.

Acacia colei
Up to 1.8% DMT in bark, 0.2-0.6% leaf[14] http://www.abc.net.au/sc...mp;a/notes/051027-9.htm
This needs confirmation, and the original source of this info is unknown (other than ‘Ryan’). I have a suspicion this may be correct but have lost the notes to support it; awaiting a communication from an associate.

Acacia complanata
0.3% alkaloids in leaf and stem, almost all N-methyl-tetrahydroharman, with traces of tetrahydroharman, some of tryptamine[15][16][17]
*Not aware of any finding of tryptamine in the published literature; having trouble connecting to the pages cited.

Acacia concinna
Nicotine[18]

Acacia confusa
DMT & NMT in leaf, stem & bark 0.04% NMT and 0.02% DMT in stem.[3] Also N,N-dimethyltryptamine N-oxide[19]
*This is an incomplete simplification of the known chemistry of this species, but it’s basically accurate.

Acacia constricta
β-methyl-phenethylamine[6]
* As it is not actually known whether β-methyl-phenethylamine is psychoactive, this should probably not be on the list. Also, the identification of the alkaloid present was tentative.

Acacia coriacea
Ash used in Pituri.[4][20] Not known if psychoactive.
*The ash is used in pituri, but can find no verification for it being psychoactive, so shouldn’t be on the list.

Acacia cornigera
Psychoactive,[20] Tryptamines[21]
* Rätsch speculated that it may contain tryptamines such as DMT, but this remains speculation. The root is used as an aphrodisiac (this being the presumed source of claims of psychoactivity) and may have been added to balche.

Acacia cultriformis
Tryptamine, in the leaf, stem[3] and seeds.[9] Phenethylamine in leaf and seeds[9]
*There is also a tentative observation of 5-MeO-DMT in phyllodes, stems and flowers (Trout & Friends).

Acacia cuthbertsonii
Psychoactive[11]
*This has been posted online in a list of Australian psychoactive plants, but I can find no further supporting info.

Acacia delibrata
Psychoactive[11]
*This has been posted online in a list of Australian psychoactive plants, but I can find no further supporting info.
Its seed pods are known to contain a toxic saponin (Hurst 1942).

Acacia falcata
Psychoactive,[11] but less than 0.02% alkaloids[22]
*This has been posted online in a list of Australian psychoactive plants, but I can find no further supporting info, except for the fact that the bark has been used to poison fish. It’s unclear whether the fish are stunned, or killed.
Traces of unidentified alkaloids (and sometimes none) were observed in alkaloid screening.

Acacia farnesiana
Traces of 5-MeO-DMT[23] in fruit. β-methyl-phenethylamine, flower.[24] Ether extracts about 2-6% of the dried leaf mass.[5] Alkaloids are present in the bark[25] and leaves.[26] Amphetamines and mescaline also found in tree.[21]
*Here’s a messy one! The 5-MeO-DMT report (as well as an unidentified β-carboline) from immature seed pods is attributable to Trout & Friends. Ghosal (1972) reported tryptamine from stem bark; most other researchers have found no alkaloids throughout the plant. I’m not aware of any finding of β-methyl-phenethylamine from this species, and the reference doesn’t support it. The report of amphetamines and mescaline is surely a confusion with the similar dubious reports from berlandieri and rigidula.

Acacia filiciana
Added to Pulque, but not known if psychoactive[20]
* Not known to be psychoactive, so shouldn’t be on the list.

Acacia floribunda
Tryptamine, phenethylamine,[27] in flowers[9] other tryptamines, phenethylamines[28]
*There’s no reports of other phenethylamines, as far as I know. Tryptamine and phenethylamine were also found in ‘tops’, ie. stem tips with phyllodes. There have been independent findings from phyllodes and bark of DMT, NMT, tryptamine, harman and norharman, with the DMT being a definite from bark and phyllodes.

Acacia greggii
N-methyl-β-phenethylamine,[6] phenethylamine
* As it is not actually known whether β-methyl-phenethylamine is psychoactive, this should probably not be on the list. The same study (Camp & Norvell 1966) observed tyramine as well, though the identification of both was tentative.

Acacia harpophylla
Phenethylamine, hordenine at a ratio of 2:3 in dried leaves, 0.6% total[2]
*0.6% was the higher range found; the lowest was 0.1%. Bark contained 0.3% alkaloids (also see CSIRO 1990).

Acacia holoserica
Hordenine, 1.2% in bark[2]
*Proper spelling is holosericea.

Acacia horrida
Psychoactive[20]
*Can’t find this listed in the reference source, and am otherwise unaware of any reports of this species being psychoactive.

Acacia implexa
Psychoactive[29]
*I wouldn’t trust the source given for this info, and can find nothing else to support it. Roots were once mistakenly reported to have given a tentative positive for 5-MeO-DMT by Trout; this was an error due to a mix-up of plants.

Acacia jurema
DMT, NMT
*I can find no supporting info for this. Perhaps an assumption based on the vague report that it is used to make ‘jurema wine’, which is in itself requiring better supporting info. It’s apparently named because it grows near a town called Jurema in Brazil.

Acacia karroo
Psychoactive
*I can find no supporting info for this.

Acacia kempeana
Used in Pituri, but not known if psychoactive.[20]
*Not known to be psychoactive; shouldn’t be on the list.

Acacia kettlewelliae
1.5[2]-1.88%[30] alkaloids, 92% consisting of phenylethylamine.[2] 0.9% N-methyl-2-phenylethylamine found a different time.[2]
*N-methyl-2-phenylethylamine is β-methyl-phenethylamine, or N-methyl-phenethylamine. The lower range of alkaloid yield was actually 1.3% from White 1957, and 1.5% from Fitzgerald 1964.

Acacia laeta
DMT, in the leaf[3]
*This is an error introduced by Shulgin in TIHKAL. It was listed in an article that tested some African Acacias, finding DMT in some; however, this was one of the negatives. Its mention there is probably the source of the error.

Acacia lingulata
Used in Pituri, but not known if psychoactive.[20]
*Not known to be psychoactive; shouldn’t be on the list. Correct spelling is ligulata.

Acacia longifolia
0.2% tryptamine in bark, leaves, some in flowers, phenylethylamine in flowers,[27] 0.2% DMT in plant.[31] Histamine alkaloids.[22]
*This is a big simplification of the published studies for this species, but basically accurate. There is no published paper reporting finding DMT in this species, though many people have been confused by a thesis (Nichols 1983) which listed DMT, NMT, and other tryptamines, phenethylamines, beta-carbolines and histamines, but the reference was to another thesis (Rovelli 1967), which only reported finding the histamines. Perhaps the confusion ultimately comes down to the listing of all of these alkaloids as reference standards, and hasty mis-reading of the data. HOWEVER, some strains of longifolia certainly have been found to contain DMT by independent psychonauts (as confirmed by bioassay of extracts).

Acacia longifolia var. sophorae
Tryptamine in leaves, bark[9] Several reports of DMT content unconfirmed[32]
*I’m not aware of any finding of tryptamine in this plant. As with longifolia var. longifolia, histamine derivatives were found by Rovelli (1967), and Nichols (1983) mis-reported it as also containing the alkaloids listed for longifolia, as well as nicotine.
There exists an unpublished analysis of California-grown sophorae, claimed to have found DMT, bufotenine, 5-MeO-DMT, gramine and histamine-derivatives (0.6% in bark, 0.15% in phyllodes), though DMT was apparently a minor component.

Acacia macradenia
Tryptamine[9]
*Can’t find any good reference for this claim.

Acacia maidenii
0.6% NMT and DMT in about a 2:3 ratio in the stem bark, both present in leaves[3]
*Alkaloid content is known to be variable, with only some strains being relatively alkaloid-rich (independent research).

Acacia mangium
Psychoactive[20]
*Rätsch made no such statement in his book. The species is referred to as having ash that’s high in minerals and salts, including sodium, and that’s it. Are people assuming stuff is psychoactive just because the name appears in the index of a book on psychoactives?
This species may well turn out to contain psychoactive alkaloids, and there have been some independent reports that it does, but these are not in Rätsch’s encyclopedia.

?Acacia melanoxylon
DMT, in the bark and leaf,[33] but less than 0.02% total alkaloids[22]
The claim of DMT in this species was only recently clarified by nen888 in this discussion thread; until then, I could find no primary mention of this on the net. Regardless, it only applied to some examples of the species, and I have no idea how good the sources were at identifying their plant material – the few positives may have been another species. This needs more clarification. The reference link for 33 is dead.

Acacia mellifera
DMT, in the leaf[3]
*See Acacia laeta for explanation.

Acacia nilotica
DMT, in the leaf[3]
*See Acacia laeta for explanation. However, later independent analysis tentatively observed traces of 5-MeO-DMT in stems, roots and leaves. DMT, NMT and 5-MeO-DMT were tentatively observed in seeds, but follow-up tests were negative (Heffter 1996; Trout ed. 1997).

Acacia nilotica subsp. adstringens
Psychoactive, DMT in the leaf
*A. nilotica and nilotica ssp. subalata, as well as other Acacia species, have intoxicating use by the Masai, but I’m not aware of this particular subspecies being used in the same way. This doesn’t mean it hasn’t been, however. I’m also not aware of any reference finding DMT in the plant, and that may be an assumption due to the often repeated claim of DMT from nilotica.

Acacia obtusifolia
Tryptamine, DMT, NMT, other tryptamines,[34] 0.1-0.5% in dried bark, 0.07% in branch tips, variable[35]
*Beta-carbolines, probably harman and norharman, have been observed in traces in independent analysis. Reports of bufotenine and/or 5-MeO-DMT being present are uncertain, as they have not been observed in some tests. It is well known that the alkaloid levels and makeup in this species are highly variable over seasons, different times of day and different populations. However, DMT is generally the major alkaloid present.

Acacia oerfota
Less than 0.1% DMT in leaf,[36] NMT
*Still searching for any supporting info on this one.

Acacia penninervis
Psychoactive[11]
* This has been posted online in a list of Australian psychoactive plants, but I can find no further supporting info, except for the fact that the leaves and bark have been used to poison fish. It’s unclear whether the fish are stunned, or killed.
An alkaloid screening detected alkaloids in leaves and bark.

Acacia phlebophylla
0.3% DMT in leaf, NMT[3]
*I’m not aware of any reports of NMT from this species and couldn’t find any searching the reference.

Acacia podalyriaefolia
Tryptamine in the leaf,[3] 0.5% to 2% DMT in fresh bark, phenethylamine, trace amounts[27]
*Various studies on stems and leaves (and seeds and pods) have found tryptamine and phenethylamine in various yields and proportions, sometimes with one absent (White 1944, 1951, 1957). As far as I know the claim of DMT being present is a mistake, and is not supported by reference 27.

Acacia polyacantha
DMT in leaf[3] and other tryptamines in leaf, bark
*As far as I know the parent species has never been analysed for alkaloids, and this is perhaps a confusion with the report of polyacantha ssp. camplyacantha as listed below.

Acacia polyacantha ssp. campylacantha
Less than 0.2% DMT in leaf, NMT; DMT and other tryptamines in leaf, bark[37]
*I am only aware of a finding of 0.004% DMT from leaves. Hortipedia is hardly a good reference to trust for this.

Acacia prominens
Phenylethylamine, β-methyl-phenethylamine[2][27]
* As it is not actually known whether β-methyl-phenethylamine is psychoactive, this should probably not be on the list. Phenethylamine is psychoactive, but not in a practical way.

Acacia pruinocarpa
Ash used in Pituri.[4][20] Not known if psychoactive.
*Not known to be psychoactive; shouldn’t be on the list.

Acacia pycnantha
Ash used in Pituri,[20] but less than 0.02% total alkaloids.[22] Recent findings of 0.4% DMT in single tree[38]
*Also, phyllodes collected from a variety of trees in Eltham, Victoria, gave small traces of crude alkaloidal material that appeared to be DMT.
Reference 38, according to the source, should be talk at Exodus Festival 2002, NSW.

Acacia retinodes
DMT, NMT,[39] nicotine,[21] but less than 0.02% total alkaloids found[22]
One study (Rovelli 1967) found a main alkaloid in phyllodes that did not appear to be nicotine, and was not identified. The claim here of DMT and NMT may be related to Rovelli’s listing of them amongst the reference compounds, but he did not report finding them in this species. It’s worth noting that Fikenscher 1960, the original report of nicotine, stated that they weren’t certain of the identity of the plants used, because they weren’t in flower. There is a recent report on these forums of a species allied to retinodes, growing introduced in Bolivia that may be provincialis yielding alkaloidal material that appeared to contain tryptamines of some kind.

Acacia rigidula
DMT, NMT, tryptamine, amphetamines, mescaline, nicotine and others[40]
*See A. berlandieri for explanation. Earlier, more believable studies tentatively identified N-methyl-tyramine and N-methyl-phenethylamine as the main alkaloids of leaves (Camp & Norvell 1966).

Acacia roemeriana
β-methyl-phenethylamine[6]
*Also reported in the same study (original ref – Camp & Norvell 1966) were tyramine and N-methyl-tyramine (all from leaves, 0.036% combined).

Acacia salicina
Ash used in Pituri.[4][20] Not known if psychoactive.
*Not known to be psychoactive; shouldn’t be on list.

Acacia sassa
Psychoactive[20]
* Can’t find this listed in the reference source, and am otherwise unaware of any reports of this species being psychoactive. Has previously been classified under Albizzia, Inga, Mimosa and Zygia.

Acacia schaffneri
β-methyl-phenethylamine, Phenethylamine Amphetamines and mescaline also found.[21]
*Not aware of references for any of this. Report of amphetamines and mescaline is surely a confusion with the similar dubious reports from berlandieri and rigidula.

Acacia schottii
β-methyl-phenethylamine[6]
*This alkaloid was only tentatively identified.

Acacia senegal
Less than 0.1% DMT in leaf,[3] NMT, other tryptamines. DMT in plant,[24] DMT in bark.[9]
*Only 0.003% DMT was found in leaf. I’m not aware of any other studies, or of any finding of NMT or tryptamine. Reference 24 only lists DMT and does not mention NMT or other tryptamines.

Acacia seyal
DMT, in the leaf.[3] Ether extracts about 1-7% of the dried leaf mass.[5]
*See Acacia laeta for explanation.

Acacia sieberiana
DMT, in the leaf[3]
*See Acacia laeta for explanation.

Acacia simplex
DMT and NMT, in the leaf, stem and trunk bark, 0.81% DMT in bark, MMT[3][41]
*The currently accepted name for this species of simplicifolia. The study in question (Poupat et al. 1976) looked at phyllodes and stem bark, but not trunk bark per se. Total alkaloids yielded 3.6% (40% NMT [MMT], 22.5% DMT, 12.7% 2-methyl-tetrahydro-beta-carboline, traces of N-formyl-NMT [artefact of extraction?]).

Acacia taxensis
β-methyl-phenethylamine[6]
*Correct name is texensis. Tyramine and N-methyl-phenethylamine were tentatively identified, amongst 0.008% alkaloids from leaves (Camp & Norvell 1966).

Acacia tortilis
DMT, NMT, and other tryptamines[34]
*See Acacia laeta for explanation.

Acacia vestita
Tryptamine, in the leaf and stem,[3] but less than 0.02% total alkaloids[22]
*Alkaloid content was highest in May (0.28%) and October (0.12%), and lowest in January (0.03-0.04%) and July-August (0.08%); up to 83% of the total alkaloid was tryptamine (White 1957). Reference 22 does not support the claim made here.

Acacia victoriae
Tryptamines, 5-MeO-alkyltryptamine[9]1.2% approx DMT in bark[42]
*Trout & Friends reported a tentative positive result for DMT in aerial parts of a 1 year old plant, and 5-MeO-DMT in roots of 2 year old seedlings, though this requires confirmation. Previous alkaloid screenings were inconclusive (one found no alkaloids from leaf and stem, another got a weak positive from phyllodes). Trout [in ref. 42] gave no mention of yielding 1.2% DMT from this plant, and according the Entheogen Review index, this species wasn’t mentioned in any 2001 issue.



 
dehingoli
#98 Posted : 9/6/2011 12:42:27 AM
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to sinful_speed, that's auriculiformis Smile the pods are constricted and everywhere in urban cities here in the Philippines.
Let me know if you need help. I've been doing extraction but the season is not good right now. 5meo is what you may get from this.
- my signature has been temporarily moved to another dimension.
 
nen888
#99 Posted : 9/6/2011 2:52:43 AM
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Acacia expert | Skills: Acacia, Botany, Tryptamines, CounsellingExtraordinary knowledge | Skills: Acacia, Botany, Tryptamines, CounsellingSenior Member | Skills: Acacia, Botany, Tryptamines, Counselling

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..thanks, dehingoli, i admit i was too caught up in other species ID to look closer at that!
[EDIT: would love to hear about extraction/experiences in your region...]

wira, thanks for your survey..it's because the research needs to be done that i've noted all known references to tryptamines, so it can be cleared up..i'll go through your list as i get time and see what i can add..

A. victoriae was reported to me as used in successful bioassay by vapor c.2001-3 in South Australia..i believe the source..

..it should be remembered that, to date, the majority of unconfirmed rumours have turned out to bare fruit..e.g. A.obtusifolia, A.longifolia, A.floribunda (rumoured for years, now numerous on the ground reports)..

..as for Acacia provincialis, is it's in review right now, there is no formal publication i can find (other than older groupings within A. retinodes), but it remains a good indicator name..
how one would prove yatiqiri's tree is not infact A.retinodes var.retinodes X A.saligna is beyond me (& probably most botanists as well)

so for now, here's an A. retinodes variety naturalized in Hawaii...
nen888 attached the following image(s):
acacia retinodes-Maui, Hawaii.jpg (184kb) downloaded 1,252 time(s).
 
nen888
#100 Posted : 9/6/2011 3:02:43 AM
member for the trees

Acacia expert | Skills: Acacia, Botany, Tryptamines, CounsellingExtraordinary knowledge | Skills: Acacia, Botany, Tryptamines, CounsellingSenior Member | Skills: Acacia, Botany, Tryptamines, Counselling

Posts: 3870
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Last visit: 01-Dec-2020
..while not spectacular, i can add (as it's a start)

..a very crude 20mg extract (from 80g Acacia falcata phyllodes & twigs, roadside) was assayed recently..it was collected from young, planted trees (3-4ft) which were on mass by a highway..STB methanol/NaOH/napatha
..it was a pale brown wax with a faintly sweet smell..due to the small amount, purification was not performed, and it was trialed with whatever tars/gums/waxes/tannins may have been present (there was probably less than 20mg actual alkaloid)

..it was certainly 'psychoactive', but the amount taken was too small too really say what kind of activity it was, 'tryptamine-like'..but only +1 level at this stage..A. falcata has previously been reported as simply 'psychoactive' in Pharm.Excipients..

..the smoke (which may have still contained tars) was very harsh and odd tasting, and taken in two inhalations, each only held a few seconds..
..there was an immediate sense of pressure and movement in the frontal part of the face/forehead, and over the next 30 seconds a slight sense of receding from ordinary space..from the 1-5 minute point there were faint closed-eye 'pixilation'/organized phosphene type images and a faint but persistent high pitched buzz/wave sound..5-40minutes was a sense of being slightly pleasantly 'stoned', for want of a better description..effects gone 45-60 mins..

..more mature specimens of the plant will be tested, and purified to crystaline material before further tests can be contemplated..hopefully reagents can indicate roughly what might be present..

also, the material was collected while the plant was in flower (to be sure of ID), but this is, in experience, a time when acacia alkaloids can be changed or reduced...
nen888 attached the following image(s):
A.falcata.JPG (35kb) downloaded 1,225 time(s).
Acacia falcata phyllode.jpg (34kb) downloaded 1,229 time(s).
 
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