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Freeze tolerant perennial entheogens Options
 
ChristianMeteor
#21 Posted : 6/21/2021 6:06:29 AM

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kerelsk wrote:
Peganum harmala can tolerate hard frost and snow cover. Perfect garden pairing with Desmanthus illinoensis and/or D. leptolobus.
Really benefits from full sun, in tree filled areas needs some open space.

Passiflora incarnata can be used as a caapi analog, although less potent. I need to bioassay my Lespedeza bicolor plants, but they are growing beautifully in zone 6b, star performers. If they contain usable quantities of dmt it would be the perfect plant. The leaves are edible after boiling supposedly.

And of course some varieties of Ipomoea tricolor flower quickly and can be seeded as an annual. I think this species might actually be the most viable psychedelic plant for very northern latitudes.


I have some peganum harmala seeds on hand, but I had a tough time getting them to sprout and stay alive. I should look into a more detailed growing technique (any tips?)

Illinois Bundleflower has been suggested, and after some research I'm shopping seeds. It appears to prefer a climate very similar to the one I have available. https://illinoiswildflowers.info/ mentions the foliage as having a high protein content as well (and appears to be edible) and I have been looking for a perennial salad green to include in my garden.

In terms of Morning Glories, I have had some past success with these, but have planted them too late in the season to see them to flowering. They are still a strong consideration, but with Hawaiian Baby Wood rose being significantly more potent, I am drawn to "jumping through some hoops" to cultivate that one.

Thanks for the suggestions-I'll certainly be giving bundle flower a go.
 

Good quality Syrian rue (Peganum harmala) for an incredible price!
 
ChristianMeteor
#22 Posted : 6/21/2021 6:12:16 AM

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Quetzal7 wrote:
Psilo azurescens, cyanescens, allenii.
If you aren't trained in growing mushroom, well, great, they are about the easiest. You can just buy some spawn and mix with fresh wood chip ( i use a 2% spawning rate! but try something like 10% if you want to be sure). Many deciduous hardwood are suitable - but in my area, it's easier to source acacia (dealbata) and it works great too =)

Cactus : i'm in zone 8a, with cold, wet winter. Cactus have hard time in winter ; but if they have just a roof, they are fine. It's not the cold, but the humidity that kill them.
Also, if they are berely watered in the second half of the summer, they tend to be less juicy and survive better (but grow much slower)

I'm trying acacia floribunda and acuminata... we will see how is their first winter outside =)

I got some Elaeagnus (as a N-fixer and for the berries ), they have harmal-alk , though i didn't research much about it yet

what else? well, Amanitas are easy to find =)


I have no experience growing mushrooms but I'm keen on giving it a try. You mention a rather hands off method of putting some spores into a woodchip pile, and I would like you to elaborate on that or offer more info. I actually have a big pile of woodchips from a tree waste company that dumps annually (I use it to mulch my beds). I wonder how long it would take from "seed" to produce with that method, and if I could do something like that in a greenhouse maybe?
 
downwardsfromzero
#23 Posted : 6/21/2021 8:52:49 PM

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ChristianMeteor wrote:
I have no experience growing mushrooms but I'm keen on giving it a try. You mention a rather hands off method of putting some spores into a woodchip pile, and I would like you to elaborate on that or offer more info. I actually have a big pile of woodchips from a tree waste company that dumps annually (I use it to mulch my beds). I wonder how long it would take from "seed" to produce with that method, and if I could do something like that in a greenhouse maybe?

Looks like you might be set up for woodloving mushrooms. If your wood chip deliveries are the right kind of wood (nothing too resinous) you have a few months to look into the best ways of starting before inoculating the bed in mid-autumn. Start in spring if your winters are particularly harsh.

Quote:
I have some peganum harmala seeds on hand, but I had a tough time getting them to sprout and stay alive. I should look into a more detailed growing technique (any tips?)
There are a couple of good threads with rue cultivation tips. Sounds like you've had the same trouble as me in getting them beyond the seedling stage. They sprout pretty well after a couple of boils but not after toasting. Pretty remarkable, really. After that, too wet or too dry will kill them off - it's somehow ironic.




“There is a way of manipulating matter and energy so as to produce what modern scientists call 'a field of force'. The field acts on the observer and puts him in a privileged position vis-à-vis the universe. From this position he has access to the realities which are ordinarily hidden from us by time and space, matter and energy. This is what we call the Great Work."
― Jacques Bergier, quoting Fulcanelli
 
Quetzal7
#24 Posted : 6/24/2021 7:08:08 PM

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ChristianMeteor wrote:
Quetzal7 wrote:
Psilo azurescens, cyanescens, allenii.
If you aren't trained in growing mushroom, well, great, they are about the easiest. You can just buy some spawn and mix with fresh wood chip ( i use a 2% spawning rate! but try something like 10% if you want to be sure). Many deciduous hardwood are suitable - but in my area, it's easier to source acacia (dealbata) and it works great too =)

Cactus : i'm in zone 8a, with cold, wet winter. Cactus have hard time in winter ; but if they have just a roof, they are fine. It's not the cold, but the humidity that kill them.
Also, if they are berely watered in the second half of the summer, they tend to be less juicy and survive better (but grow much slower)

I'm trying acacia floribunda and acuminata... we will see how is their first winter outside =)

I got some Elaeagnus (as a N-fixer and for the berries ), they have harmal-alk , though i didn't research much about it yet

what else? well, Amanitas are easy to find =)


I have no experience growing mushrooms but I'm keen on giving it a try. You mention a rather hands off method of putting some spores into a woodchip pile, and I would like you to elaborate on that or offer more info. I actually have a big pile of woodchips from a tree waste company that dumps annually (I use it to mulch my beds). I wonder how long it would take from "seed" to produce with that method, and if I could do something like that in a greenhouse maybe?


Surely
To start from spore is rather difficult and would require a whole set of knowledge and material. Much easier would be to buy a spawn bag (already colonized bag of rye, generally 1 or 2kg ). I always make the beds in the spring but autumn should be a good time too. Use freshly chip woodchips as much as possible (to be use within 1 week after being chipped). You can buy the spawn and keep it in the fridge until you get you chips delivered or so Smile
Dig a bed 50x100cm (for exemple), 20cm deep. Put on layer of woodchip, sprinkler with the spawn (rye grain), another layer of woochip, another layer of spawn, ... until it's full.
As i do it in tthe spring, i get a poor flush the first year, and it starts to produce fully the following year. Condition for fruiting : a cold snap, like a small frost at the beginning of the fall ... 2 weeks after here they are!
tip : if you have a really dry and hot summer like here, don't water them. that only bring mold to develop. they are fine with no water Pleased


 
downwardsfromzero
#25 Posted : 6/24/2021 10:39:57 PM

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If you can't use wood chips that are a week or less old, submerge them in rainwater for a month or two - longer is also O.K.. They will start to smell funky (well, stink) but once they've soaked you'll rinse them thoroughly in fresh water anyhow. This soak time gives you a while to sort out the spawn and location. Large, sturdy plastic tubs work well if you have a good place to put them (shaded and sheltered from strong winds).
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“There is a way of manipulating matter and energy so as to produce what modern scientists call 'a field of force'. The field acts on the observer and puts him in a privileged position vis-à-vis the universe. From this position he has access to the realities which are ordinarily hidden from us by time and space, matter and energy. This is what we call the Great Work."
― Jacques Bergier, quoting Fulcanelli
 
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