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New book club: Options
 
Connor137
#1 Posted : 8/30/2019 12:05:03 PM

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Posts: 31
Joined: 15-Jul-2018
Last visit: 05-Dec-2019
Location: 🖥
Hi, thanks for sharing.

poisonous cat turd wrote:
“A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects. “ - Robert Heinlein

One of the least obviously psychedelic authors ever. His book Job: A Comedy of Injustice is hilarious and frightening and I bet you’ll devour it in a week


Although there are large differences between the human race and the animal kingdom, I believe there is a lot humans could learn, in regards to the instinctive behaviours that insects display. Each knows there place in a successfully functioning system, and without the same means of communication or cognitive ability, carries out its specific role for the benefit of the whole.

There are several examples in Heinlein's list , such as “plan an invasion” and “fight efficiently” that do not occur to me as the desired behaviours of an advanced people. His view of what a human should be, or is able to do, seems to me to be based on their current primality, although the majority of what he has provided are noteworthy skills.

Connor

[Edited]
Reality is a simulation, what lies beyond is too complex to fully comprehend.
 

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Connor137
#2 Posted : 9/8/2019 5:28:59 PM

💜


Posts: 31
Joined: 15-Jul-2018
Last visit: 05-Dec-2019
Location: 🖥
Hi again.

poisonous cat turd wrote:


Methinks ya maybe anthropomorphising a bit there, bruh. Insects “know there place”?


I do not believe that insects, functioning in unity for the benefit of the whole, is an anthropomorphic statement. I am arguing that they display vital behaviour that we do not. Particular Insects, such as Ants and Bees, have displayed this communal behaviour from our first observations of them, and it can be observed as a great example of what humans actually fail on doing, which is working together in every respect, and not against each other for purposes of greed, as we see particularly in western capitalist societies. Every Ant knows role in the nest, and works tirelessly for the benefit of the colony, to ensure it completes its task. Without such dedication to their role, the colony would not survive. I believe these characteristics that are found in insect behaviour, are intrinsic to their existence, and not to ours; as we are born with the apparent choice of our societal role, and can be found quite regularly working for selfish means, rather than for the advancement of the whole species. This was the reason for my initial comment, as I see potential benefit from examining their behaviour, and then discussing what aspects of it we could learn from.

Thank you for the recommendation of Heinlin's book, I have since undertaken some research on him, as I am always happy to broaden my knowledge base regarding different perspectives.

In regards to this comment

poisonous cat turd wrote:

That’s sides the point though. You want I should book learn you more? Join the club


I am not sure if this is a thinly veiled insult, or a genuine offer for you to share your knowledge. On the assumption that it's an offer to share more knowledge, I am happy to discuss any topic further Smile

Connor
Reality is a simulation, what lies beyond is too complex to fully comprehend.
 
 
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